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Review: Speed Bumps

Review: Speed Bumps REVIEW Review Speed Bumps RICHARD TARUSKIN The Cambridge History of Nineteenth-Century Music. Edited by Jim Samson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. xv, 772 pp. The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Music. Edited by Nicholas Cook and Anthony Pople. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xviii, 818 pp. Preliminary disclaimer: Any attempt to review 1,623 pages containing the work of forty-six contributors must of course be invidiously selective. This review, driven by issues rather than content, will be more invidiously selective than usual. My apologies to the unmentioned; I certainly don't mean to imply that what is unmentioned is unmentionable. I Musicologists who have made their decision to let Theodor W. Adorno do their thinking for them take it as an axiom that, to quote Robert Walser, "social relations and struggles are enacted within music itself."1 Walser says we all should have learned this from Adorno long ago, but some of us, having been briefly beguiled by the notion, have concluded that it is hogwash. The "enactment" to which Walser refers in context is that of the "cultural politics" of Bach's music as interpreted by Susan McClary in what even McClary would probably now describe as one of her more extravagant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

Review: Speed Bumps

19th-Century Music , Volume 29 (2) – Oct 1, 2005

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
Subject
Book Review
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2005.29.2.185
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW Review Speed Bumps RICHARD TARUSKIN The Cambridge History of Nineteenth-Century Music. Edited by Jim Samson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. xv, 772 pp. The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Music. Edited by Nicholas Cook and Anthony Pople. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xviii, 818 pp. Preliminary disclaimer: Any attempt to review 1,623 pages containing the work of forty-six contributors must of course be invidiously selective. This review, driven by issues rather than content, will be more invidiously selective than usual. My apologies to the unmentioned; I certainly don't mean to imply that what is unmentioned is unmentionable. I Musicologists who have made their decision to let Theodor W. Adorno do their thinking for them take it as an axiom that, to quote Robert Walser, "social relations and struggles are enacted within music itself."1 Walser says we all should have learned this from Adorno long ago, but some of us, having been briefly beguiled by the notion, have concluded that it is hogwash. The "enactment" to which Walser refers in context is that of the "cultural politics" of Bach's music as interpreted by Susan McClary in what even McClary would probably now describe as one of her more extravagant

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Oct 1, 2005

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