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Review: Discriminating Sex: White Leisure and the Making of the American ‘Oriental.’ by Amy Sueyoshi

Review: Discriminating Sex: White Leisure and the Making of the American ‘Oriental.’ by Amy Sueyoshi 510 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA QUARTERLY limited information on the Fort Yuma Reservation headquartered in California on the west side of the Colorado River, except to highlight former boarding school student and tribal leader Patrick Miguel. Through the writings of Indian agents, Mathes and Brigandi detail the intro- duction of Western medicine to Native Americans of the Mission Indian Agency. Spanish missionaries, army doctors, and other medical professionals migrating into California provided limited Western medicine to tribal people. The federal govern- ment provided minimal health care to Indian people during the late nineteenth century, often offered by missionary doctors working within the agency before the Indian Service became more involved in improving Indian health. The authors expose the ill health, historical trauma, and anomie resulting from the removal of Indians from their homelands to reservations where the government forced them to live with former enemies. One of the most moving segments of this book focused on the theft of Indian lands through legal means. During the late nineteenth century, private non-Native land owners pressed several Indians living in villages located on large tracks of privately-owned land to leave their homelands and move to a reser- vation. This included Kumeyaay, Cupen ˜o, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern California Quarterly University of California Press

Review: Discriminating Sex: White Leisure and the Making of the American ‘Oriental.’ by Amy Sueyoshi

Southern California Quarterly , Volume 100 (4): 4 – Nov 1, 2018

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2018 by The Historical Society of Southern California
ISSN
0038-3929
eISSN
2162-8637
DOI
10.1525/scq.2018.100.4.510
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

510 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA QUARTERLY limited information on the Fort Yuma Reservation headquartered in California on the west side of the Colorado River, except to highlight former boarding school student and tribal leader Patrick Miguel. Through the writings of Indian agents, Mathes and Brigandi detail the intro- duction of Western medicine to Native Americans of the Mission Indian Agency. Spanish missionaries, army doctors, and other medical professionals migrating into California provided limited Western medicine to tribal people. The federal govern- ment provided minimal health care to Indian people during the late nineteenth century, often offered by missionary doctors working within the agency before the Indian Service became more involved in improving Indian health. The authors expose the ill health, historical trauma, and anomie resulting from the removal of Indians from their homelands to reservations where the government forced them to live with former enemies. One of the most moving segments of this book focused on the theft of Indian lands through legal means. During the late nineteenth century, private non-Native land owners pressed several Indians living in villages located on large tracks of privately-owned land to leave their homelands and move to a reser- vation. This included Kumeyaay, Cupen ˜o,

Journal

Southern California QuarterlyUniversity of California Press

Published: Nov 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.