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Preface

Preface NATHAN PLATTE Dream Analysis Preface A special issue of 19th-Century Music on film hardly needs justification. Film music came into being and into its own under the influence of the Classical and Romantic repertoire. With the standardization of film sound in the silent era, compiled scores leaned heavily on works from the previous century. During the first three decades of sound film, composers created a new idiom of orchestral underscoring by drawing on absolute and program music as well as opera and operetta. This idiom was naturalized as the vernacular of film music, even as soundtracks began to include popular songs, non-Western musics, and electronic sounds. The impact of nineteenth-century music on film has waned, but it has not ceased. The six articles in this issue address various aspects of this development. The first three are more historical. Nathan Platte shows how Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s adaptation of Mendelssohn’s music for Max Reinhardt’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935) came at a crucial juncture in the composer’s transformation from a late Romantic artist to a member of the Hollywood studio system. Martin Marks reads Preston Sturges’s Unfaithfully Yours (1948) as a satirical variant of this transformation: a masterful caricature of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2011.34.3.iii
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NATHAN PLATTE Dream Analysis Preface A special issue of 19th-Century Music on film hardly needs justification. Film music came into being and into its own under the influence of the Classical and Romantic repertoire. With the standardization of film sound in the silent era, compiled scores leaned heavily on works from the previous century. During the first three decades of sound film, composers created a new idiom of orchestral underscoring by drawing on absolute and program music as well as opera and operetta. This idiom was naturalized as the vernacular of film music, even as soundtracks began to include popular songs, non-Western musics, and electronic sounds. The impact of nineteenth-century music on film has waned, but it has not ceased. The six articles in this issue address various aspects of this development. The first three are more historical. Nathan Platte shows how Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s adaptation of Mendelssohn’s music for Max Reinhardt’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935) came at a crucial juncture in the composer’s transformation from a late Romantic artist to a member of the Hollywood studio system. Martin Marks reads Preston Sturges’s Unfaithfully Yours (1948) as a satirical variant of this transformation: a masterful caricature of

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Mar 1, 2011

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