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On the Limits of Genre: Some Nineteenth-Century Barcaroles

On the Limits of Genre: Some Nineteenth-Century Barcaroles 19 TH CENTURY MUSIC On the Limits of Genre: Some Nineteenth-Century Barcaroles RODNEY STENNING EDGECOMBE In his brief entry on the barcarole for the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Maurice E. J. Brown observes that a “basic feature of the barcarolle is the time signature, 6, 8 with a marked lilting rhythm depicting the movement of the boat.” He goes on to note that the form “has been much used in romantic opera, where it has a sentimental, even melancholy atmosphere.”1 Although blameless at rst glance, those observations require a great deal of ne tuning. For one thing, the barcarole subsists in many more metric con gurations than 6, as Brown himself concedes when he 8 mentions Chopin’s 12 version. In addition, both 8 Rossini’s Otello (1816) and Donizetti’s L’elisir d’amore (1832) contain barcaroles in 2, and 4 Tchaikovsky chose common meter for the boat Maurice J. E. Brown, “Barcarolle” in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie, 20 vols. (London, 1980), vol. 2, p. 145. song that depicts June in Les Mois de l’année (1876). The picture is further complicated by barcaroles that change time signature in Pacini’s Maria regina d’Inghilterra http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

On the Limits of Genre: Some Nineteenth-Century Barcaroles

19th-Century Music , Volume 24 (3) – Apr 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
Subject
Research Article
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2001.24.3.252
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

19 TH CENTURY MUSIC On the Limits of Genre: Some Nineteenth-Century Barcaroles RODNEY STENNING EDGECOMBE In his brief entry on the barcarole for the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Maurice E. J. Brown observes that a “basic feature of the barcarolle is the time signature, 6, 8 with a marked lilting rhythm depicting the movement of the boat.” He goes on to note that the form “has been much used in romantic opera, where it has a sentimental, even melancholy atmosphere.”1 Although blameless at rst glance, those observations require a great deal of ne tuning. For one thing, the barcarole subsists in many more metric con gurations than 6, as Brown himself concedes when he 8 mentions Chopin’s 12 version. In addition, both 8 Rossini’s Otello (1816) and Donizetti’s L’elisir d’amore (1832) contain barcaroles in 2, and 4 Tchaikovsky chose common meter for the boat Maurice J. E. Brown, “Barcarolle” in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie, 20 vols. (London, 1980), vol. 2, p. 145. song that depicts June in Les Mois de l’année (1876). The picture is further complicated by barcaroles that change time signature in Pacini’s Maria regina d’Inghilterra

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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