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Merited or Inherited?

Merited or Inherited? This essay builds on Cheryl I. Harris's conception of racialized property and bell hooks's notion of aesthetic inheritance to analyze the “double down” and “call-out culture” as performances at play in the aftermath of Martin J. Medhurst's 2019 editorial about the National Communication Association Executive Committee's decision regarding the selection of new Distinguished Scholars. The essay offers a descriptive analysis that places merit and inheritance in conversation and argues for five specific strategies for countering white supremacy in the academy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Departures in Critical Qualitative Research University of California Press

Merited or Inherited?

Merited or Inherited?

Departures in Critical Qualitative Research , Volume 9 (1): 9 – Mar 1, 2020

Abstract

This essay builds on Cheryl I. Harris's conception of racialized property and bell hooks's notion of aesthetic inheritance to analyze the “double down” and “call-out culture” as performances at play in the aftermath of Martin J. Medhurst's 2019 editorial about the National Communication Association Executive Committee's decision regarding the selection of new Distinguished Scholars. The essay offers a descriptive analysis that places merit and inheritance in conversation and argues for five specific strategies for countering white supremacy in the academy.

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2020 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, http://www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints.
ISSN
2333-9489
eISSN
2333-9497
DOI
10.1525/dcqr.2020.9.1.11
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay builds on Cheryl I. Harris's conception of racialized property and bell hooks's notion of aesthetic inheritance to analyze the “double down” and “call-out culture” as performances at play in the aftermath of Martin J. Medhurst's 2019 editorial about the National Communication Association Executive Committee's decision regarding the selection of new Distinguished Scholars. The essay offers a descriptive analysis that places merit and inheritance in conversation and argues for five specific strategies for countering white supremacy in the academy.

Journal

Departures in Critical Qualitative ResearchUniversity of California Press

Published: Mar 1, 2020

Keywords: Merit; Double down; Call-out culture; Faculty of color; White supremacy

There are no references for this article.