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James Bidgood: Reveries and Mariette Pathy Allen: Rites of Passage, 1978–2006: Museum of Sex, New York: March 28–September 8, 2019

James Bidgood: Reveries and Mariette Pathy Allen: Rites of Passage, 1978–2006: Museum of Sex, New... In view of this year’s fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall riots, New York City galleries and museums are brimming with contemporary and retrospective exhibitions reflecting on the history of LGBTQ rights and themes of sexual and gender identity, associated cultures, and social action, providing the Museum of Sex stiff companionship [Images 1 and 2].1 IMAGE 1. Statues and Slave (Bobby Kendall) from the film Pink Narcissus (1965–71) by James Bidgood; courtesy ClampArt, New York. IMAGE 2. Harlem Drag Ball (1984) by Mariette Pathy Allen; courtesy the Museum of Sex. Founded in 2002 by Daniel Gluck, in consultation with social critic Camille Paglia, among others, the Museum of Sex was envisioned to be a sort of “Smithsonian of Sex,” and has weathered a number of controversies and rebrandings over the years.2 The museum continues to develop its permanent collections and organize exhibitions of artifacts and representations of, or related to, a wide range of sexual and gender cultures. On my first visit since its hiring of the artistic and creative director Serge Becker3 and continuing renovation, I could sense the potent combination of liberationist and pedagogical tendencies as I moved from one exhibition to the next of the four main shows currently on. In passing from floor to floor, one first discovers a small exhibition on stag films titled STAG: The Illicit Origins of Pornographic Film (sponsored by PornHub), then two others sharing the next floor, namely James Bidgood: Reveries and Mariette Pathy Allen: Rites of Passage, 1978–2006 , both curated by Lissa Rivera.4 Rivera, a photographer herself, has since 2016 put together nine exhibitions in a continuing relationship with the Museum of Sex that focus on “traditionally underrepresented voices regardless of formal education or exhibition history.”5 In 2017, for example, Rivera curated the exhibition Night Fever: New … http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Afterimage: The Journal of Media Arts and Cultural Criticism University of California Press

James Bidgood: Reveries and Mariette Pathy Allen: Rites of Passage, 1978–2006: Museum of Sex, New York: March 28–September 8, 2019

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2019 by The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press’s Reprints and Permissions web page, https://www.ucpress.edu/journals/reprints-permissions.
eISSN
2578-8531
DOI
10.1525/aft.2019.463009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In view of this year’s fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall riots, New York City galleries and museums are brimming with contemporary and retrospective exhibitions reflecting on the history of LGBTQ rights and themes of sexual and gender identity, associated cultures, and social action, providing the Museum of Sex stiff companionship [Images 1 and 2].1 IMAGE 1. Statues and Slave (Bobby Kendall) from the film Pink Narcissus (1965–71) by James Bidgood; courtesy ClampArt, New York. IMAGE 2. Harlem Drag Ball (1984) by Mariette Pathy Allen; courtesy the Museum of Sex. Founded in 2002 by Daniel Gluck, in consultation with social critic Camille Paglia, among others, the Museum of Sex was envisioned to be a sort of “Smithsonian of Sex,” and has weathered a number of controversies and rebrandings over the years.2 The museum continues to develop its permanent collections and organize exhibitions of artifacts and representations of, or related to, a wide range of sexual and gender cultures. On my first visit since its hiring of the artistic and creative director Serge Becker3 and continuing renovation, I could sense the potent combination of liberationist and pedagogical tendencies as I moved from one exhibition to the next of the four main shows currently on. In passing from floor to floor, one first discovers a small exhibition on stag films titled STAG: The Illicit Origins of Pornographic Film (sponsored by PornHub), then two others sharing the next floor, namely James Bidgood: Reveries and Mariette Pathy Allen: Rites of Passage, 1978–2006 , both curated by Lissa Rivera.4 Rivera, a photographer herself, has since 2016 put together nine exhibitions in a continuing relationship with the Museum of Sex that focus on “traditionally underrepresented voices regardless of formal education or exhibition history.”5 In 2017, for example, Rivera curated the exhibition Night Fever: New …

Journal

Afterimage: The Journal of Media Arts and Cultural CriticismUniversity of California Press

Published: Sep 3, 2019

References