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Contributors

Contributors 19 TH CENTURY MUSIC Jeremy Barham is senior lecturer in music at the University of Surrey. His research interests range from the music and culture of Gustav Mahler and early modernism, through screen music, to jazz. His publications include Perspectives on Gustav Mahler (Ashgate, 2005), The Cambridge Companion to Mahler (Cambridge University Press, 2007), Alfred MathisRosenzweig: Gustav Mahler: New Insights into His Life, Times and Work (Ashgate/GSMD, 2007), and articles on screen music for Musical Quarterly, Music and the Moving Image, and Terror Tracks: Music and Sound in Horror Cinema (Equinox, 2009). He is series editor of Oxford Studies in Recorded Jazz (forthcoming) and is currently working on two monographs: Music, Time and the Moving Image (Cambridge) and Mahler, Music, Culture: Discourses of Meaning (Indiana University Press). Daniel K. L. Chua is Head of the School of Humanities and professor of music at the University of Hong Kong. He is the author of Absolute Music and the Construction of Meaning. His recent articles include "Beethoven's Other Humanism" (JAMS) and "Rioting with Stravinsky: A Particular Analysis of the Rite of Spring" (Music Analysis). Marcia J. Citron is Lovett Distinguished Service Professor of Musicology at Rice University. She is the author of When Opera Meets Film (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and Opera on Screen (Yale University Press, 2000), and forthcoming essays on the opera/film intersection for the Oxford Handbook of Opera and Oxford Handbook of Music in Film and Visual Media. Her work on gender is capped by the award-winning volume Gender and the Musical Canon (rpt. University of Illinois Press, 2000) and includes books devoted to Fanny Hensel (1987) and Cécile Chaminade (1988). Martin Marks is a film music historian and pianist, as well as a senior lecturer in Music and in Comparative Media Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His publications include Music and the Silent Film (Oxford University Press, 1997). He has served as the music curator of three DVD collections of silent films issued by the National Film Preservation Foundation (Treasures from American Film Archives I, II, and III, issued in 2000, 20044, and 2007). He is also curating the final set in the series, Treasures V: West, to be issued late in 2011. Nathan Platte completed his PhD in musicology at the University of Michigan in 2010 and has taught at Michigan and Bowling Green State Universities. His book with David Neumeyer, Franz Waxman's Rebecca: A Film Score Guide, will soon enter production at Scarecrow Press. He has published work in Music and the Moving Image and is currently coediting an anthology, The Routledge Film Music Sourcebook, with James Wierzbicki and Colin Roust. Tobias Pontara is a former professional flutist who earned his PhD in musicology from the University of Stockholm in 2007. His writings include articles on film music, historically informed performances, musical autonomy, and the problem of defining musicology as a unitary discipline. Pontara's latest article (together with Erkki Huovinen), published in Philosophical Studies in 2010, is a critical examination of the methodological procedures in contemporary aesthetics and analytical philosophy of music. Pontara is lecturer in musicology at Uppsala University. 19th-Century Music, vol. 34, no. 3, p. 356. ISSN: 0148-2076, electronic ISSN 1533-8606. © 2011 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site, at http://www.ucpressjournals.com/ reprintInfo.asp. DOI: 10.1525/ncm.2011.34.3.356. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

Contributors

19th-Century Music , Volume 34 (3) – Mar 1, 2011

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2011.34.3.356
Publisher site
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Abstract

19 TH CENTURY MUSIC Jeremy Barham is senior lecturer in music at the University of Surrey. His research interests range from the music and culture of Gustav Mahler and early modernism, through screen music, to jazz. His publications include Perspectives on Gustav Mahler (Ashgate, 2005), The Cambridge Companion to Mahler (Cambridge University Press, 2007), Alfred MathisRosenzweig: Gustav Mahler: New Insights into His Life, Times and Work (Ashgate/GSMD, 2007), and articles on screen music for Musical Quarterly, Music and the Moving Image, and Terror Tracks: Music and Sound in Horror Cinema (Equinox, 2009). He is series editor of Oxford Studies in Recorded Jazz (forthcoming) and is currently working on two monographs: Music, Time and the Moving Image (Cambridge) and Mahler, Music, Culture: Discourses of Meaning (Indiana University Press). Daniel K. L. Chua is Head of the School of Humanities and professor of music at the University of Hong Kong. He is the author of Absolute Music and the Construction of Meaning. His recent articles include "Beethoven's Other Humanism" (JAMS) and "Rioting with Stravinsky: A Particular Analysis of the Rite of Spring" (Music Analysis). Marcia J. Citron is Lovett Distinguished Service Professor of Musicology at Rice University. She is the author of When Opera Meets Film (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and Opera on Screen (Yale University Press, 2000), and forthcoming essays on the opera/film intersection for the Oxford Handbook of Opera and Oxford Handbook of Music in Film and Visual Media. Her work on gender is capped by the award-winning volume Gender and the Musical Canon (rpt. University of Illinois Press, 2000) and includes books devoted to Fanny Hensel (1987) and Cécile Chaminade (1988). Martin Marks is a film music historian and pianist, as well as a senior lecturer in Music and in Comparative Media Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His publications include Music and the Silent Film (Oxford University Press, 1997). He has served as the music curator of three DVD collections of silent films issued by the National Film Preservation Foundation (Treasures from American Film Archives I, II, and III, issued in 2000, 20044, and 2007). He is also curating the final set in the series, Treasures V: West, to be issued late in 2011. Nathan Platte completed his PhD in musicology at the University of Michigan in 2010 and has taught at Michigan and Bowling Green State Universities. His book with David Neumeyer, Franz Waxman's Rebecca: A Film Score Guide, will soon enter production at Scarecrow Press. He has published work in Music and the Moving Image and is currently coediting an anthology, The Routledge Film Music Sourcebook, with James Wierzbicki and Colin Roust. Tobias Pontara is a former professional flutist who earned his PhD in musicology from the University of Stockholm in 2007. His writings include articles on film music, historically informed performances, musical autonomy, and the problem of defining musicology as a unitary discipline. Pontara's latest article (together with Erkki Huovinen), published in Philosophical Studies in 2010, is a critical examination of the methodological procedures in contemporary aesthetics and analytical philosophy of music. Pontara is lecturer in musicology at Uppsala University. 19th-Century Music, vol. 34, no. 3, p. 356. ISSN: 0148-2076, electronic ISSN 1533-8606. © 2011 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site, at http://www.ucpressjournals.com/ reprintInfo.asp. DOI: 10.1525/ncm.2011.34.3.356.

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Mar 1, 2011

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