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Coming Home to The Brady Bunch: In Search of Latina/o Identity

Coming Home to The Brady Bunch: In Search of Latina/o Identity The television sitcom The Brady Bunch (1969–1974) and its subsequent reruns presented upper-middle-class whiteness and a version of idealized family life as normative. Its underrepresentation of racial, ethnic, and class differences did more than serve as a form of escapism for young Latina/o television watchers—it impacted their sense of identity and self-esteem, their attitudes toward their own parents, and their own later modes of parenting, as the author’s personal experience illustrates. At the same time, the series’ few episodes that did depict minority characters encouraged stereotyping that influenced the larger population. A content and visual analysis of episodes of The Brady Bunch confirms the sitcom’s repeated themes of gender and sexuality and its near absence of focus on differences of race, ethnicity, and class. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern California Quarterly University of California Press

Coming Home to The Brady Bunch: In Search of Latina/o Identity

Southern California Quarterly , Volume 101 (4): 31 – Nov 1, 2019

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2019 by The Historical Society of Southern California
ISSN
0038-3929
eISSN
2162-8637
DOI
10.1525/scq.2019.101.4.430
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The television sitcom The Brady Bunch (1969–1974) and its subsequent reruns presented upper-middle-class whiteness and a version of idealized family life as normative. Its underrepresentation of racial, ethnic, and class differences did more than serve as a form of escapism for young Latina/o television watchers—it impacted their sense of identity and self-esteem, their attitudes toward their own parents, and their own later modes of parenting, as the author’s personal experience illustrates. At the same time, the series’ few episodes that did depict minority characters encouraged stereotyping that influenced the larger population. A content and visual analysis of episodes of The Brady Bunch confirms the sitcom’s repeated themes of gender and sexuality and its near absence of focus on differences of race, ethnicity, and class.

Journal

Southern California QuarterlyUniversity of California Press

Published: Nov 1, 2019

There are no references for this article.