Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Borders and Margins

Borders and Margins I have a particular intimacy with borders. An intimacy that I inherited, but did not seek. My family history is a history of belonging and unbelonging across borders. In August 1947, my grandparents, generationally rooted to the Deraghazikhan region of Pakistan, suddenly found that their country was no longer theirs. I want to imagine what that might have felt like. You wake up one morning and find that your country is free of almost 200 years of British rule, but this freedom is accompanied by the political splicing of the country into two nation-states—secular India and the Islamic state of Pakistan. This is the geopolitical event that came to be known as the batwara (in Hindustani) and Partition (in English). My Hindu grandparents found themselves on the wrong side of the divide. For many months, my grandfather resisted crossing that border into India. He waited in the hope that the communal riots that accompanied Partition would subside. He waited for life to return to normal in Quetta—the city where my family lived, the city where my father and his two siblings were born, the city that was home. But the split was final, and in September 1947, my grandfather boarded a train and crossed the border into India, becoming at once—migrant, immigrant, refugee—in his own country. My sibling, cousins, and I are the first generation of the family to be born on the Indian side of the border. I don't remember not knowing that we were from Pakistan. I knew we were from Quetta even before I could talk (or so my mother tells … http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Departures in Critical Qualitative Research University of California Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-california-press/borders-and-margins-XVfrYOGKEw

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2019 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, http://www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints.
eISSN
2333-9497
DOI
10.1525/dcqr.2019.8.2.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I have a particular intimacy with borders. An intimacy that I inherited, but did not seek. My family history is a history of belonging and unbelonging across borders. In August 1947, my grandparents, generationally rooted to the Deraghazikhan region of Pakistan, suddenly found that their country was no longer theirs. I want to imagine what that might have felt like. You wake up one morning and find that your country is free of almost 200 years of British rule, but this freedom is accompanied by the political splicing of the country into two nation-states—secular India and the Islamic state of Pakistan. This is the geopolitical event that came to be known as the batwara (in Hindustani) and Partition (in English). My Hindu grandparents found themselves on the wrong side of the divide. For many months, my grandfather resisted crossing that border into India. He waited in the hope that the communal riots that accompanied Partition would subside. He waited for life to return to normal in Quetta—the city where my family lived, the city where my father and his two siblings were born, the city that was home. But the split was final, and in September 1947, my grandfather boarded a train and crossed the border into India, becoming at once—migrant, immigrant, refugee—in his own country. My sibling, cousins, and I are the first generation of the family to be born on the Indian side of the border. I don't remember not knowing that we were from Pakistan. I knew we were from Quetta even before I could talk (or so my mother tells …

Journal

Departures in Critical Qualitative ResearchUniversity of California Press

Published: Jun 1, 2019

References