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Book Review: Alien Nation: Chinese Migration in the Americas from the Coolie Era Through World War II

Book Review: Alien Nation: Chinese Migration in the Americas from the Coolie Era Through World... 300 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA QUARTERLY the area as the Inland Empire relied less on the citrus industry and became increasingly militarized with the establishment of military facilities and the intro- duction of Fontana’s Kaiser steel plant. Citrus groves disappeared entirely in some communities by the 1970s as a booming population marked the need for housing construction, freeway development, shopping malls, and universities. The final portion of Patterson’s book is impressive as he brings the Inland Empire into the present and reveals the causes of its economic downturn and emergence as the “warehouse empire.” According to the author, the adoption of Proposition 13 in 1978, which reassessed property taxes, had devastating effects on the region. One of the major consequences of this proposition was that it led to a substantial migration of people into the Inland Empire, as many could no longer afford property taxes associated with home ownership in coastal areas. Deindustri- alization with the closure of Kaiser Steel and General Electric in Ontario, along with the downsizing of military bases, most notably through the closure of Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino, led to the loss of tens of thousands of jobs and downward social mobility within the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern California Quarterly University of California Press

Book Review: Alien Nation: Chinese Migration in the Americas from the Coolie Era Through World War II

Southern California Quarterly , Volume 97 (3): 4 – Aug 1, 2015

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2015 by The Historical Society of Southern California
ISSN
0038-3929
eISSN
2162-8637
DOI
10.1525/scq.2015.97.3.300
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

300 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA QUARTERLY the area as the Inland Empire relied less on the citrus industry and became increasingly militarized with the establishment of military facilities and the intro- duction of Fontana’s Kaiser steel plant. Citrus groves disappeared entirely in some communities by the 1970s as a booming population marked the need for housing construction, freeway development, shopping malls, and universities. The final portion of Patterson’s book is impressive as he brings the Inland Empire into the present and reveals the causes of its economic downturn and emergence as the “warehouse empire.” According to the author, the adoption of Proposition 13 in 1978, which reassessed property taxes, had devastating effects on the region. One of the major consequences of this proposition was that it led to a substantial migration of people into the Inland Empire, as many could no longer afford property taxes associated with home ownership in coastal areas. Deindustri- alization with the closure of Kaiser Steel and General Electric in Ontario, along with the downsizing of military bases, most notably through the closure of Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino, led to the loss of tens of thousands of jobs and downward social mobility within the

Journal

Southern California QuarterlyUniversity of California Press

Published: Aug 1, 2015

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