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Afterword: Song as Subjectivity and Desire

Afterword: Song as Subjectivity and Desire AFTERWORD Afterword: Song as Subjectivity and Desire LAWRENCE KRAMER At least since the early seventeenth century, Why song? Why song and subjectivity? The music has been conceived as a form of address six articles in this special issue provoke these in which one person transmits feelings or states questions from six different standpoints that of mind to another. The address may be thought need not, perhaps should not, be synthesized. to come from the composer, the performer, or a The rhizomatic character of the writing echoes fictional surrogate; the addressee in each case the rhizomatic character of the genre. But it is is the listener, who may also be the performer still possible to pull a few threads together (and who may also have a fictional surrogate). with the aim of extending the rhizome, and The music acts as if passing a body of experi- that will be my effort in these concluding ob- ence, a sense of being a certain way, from one servations. In particular, I want to ask what the subject to another. This conception is not ex- relationship between song and subjectivity im- clusive, nor is it always explicit, but it is plies about the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png 19th-Century Music University of California Press

Afterword: Song as Subjectivity and Desire

19th-Century Music , Volume 40 (3): 5 – Mar 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2017 by the Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, http://www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints.
ISSN
0148-2076
eISSN
1533-8606
DOI
10.1525/ncm.2017.40.3.301
Publisher site
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Abstract

AFTERWORD Afterword: Song as Subjectivity and Desire LAWRENCE KRAMER At least since the early seventeenth century, Why song? Why song and subjectivity? The music has been conceived as a form of address six articles in this special issue provoke these in which one person transmits feelings or states questions from six different standpoints that of mind to another. The address may be thought need not, perhaps should not, be synthesized. to come from the composer, the performer, or a The rhizomatic character of the writing echoes fictional surrogate; the addressee in each case the rhizomatic character of the genre. But it is is the listener, who may also be the performer still possible to pull a few threads together (and who may also have a fictional surrogate). with the aim of extending the rhizome, and The music acts as if passing a body of experi- that will be my effort in these concluding ob- ence, a sense of being a certain way, from one servations. In particular, I want to ask what the subject to another. This conception is not ex- relationship between song and subjectivity im- clusive, nor is it always explicit, but it is plies about the

Journal

19th-Century MusicUniversity of California Press

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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