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Staging the Speculative: On Kim Stanley Robinson's New York 2140

Staging the Speculative: On Kim Stanley Robinson's New York 2140 Staging the Speculative On Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140 spencer adams A review of Kim Stanley Robinson, New York 2140 (New York: Orbit Books, 2017). Cited in the text as ny. In a chapter titled “Capital Sinks,” Ashley Dawson, in his 2017 book Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change, lays out a sobering vision of the present and future of urban planning and its responses to the effects of climate change. Surveying a range of recent proposals and projects in New York, Mi- ami, and Jakarta, most of which lie somewhere between rhetorically well-couched half measures against city carbon consumption and startling instances of willful blindness to future sea level rise, Daw- son’s account makes painfully clear that the relative inaction or even disregard for the oncoming effects of present city plans is continuing to set the seeds for a catastrophic future. The titular “capital sinks” are the ongoing investments that financiers and city officials regu- larly sink into new seaside buildings, artificial islands, and other planned spaces likely to exacerbate the damage, death, and contam- ination that coastal flooding will almost certainly bring about. To qui parle Vol. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences University of Nebraska Press

Staging the Speculative: On Kim Stanley Robinson's New York 2140

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1938-8020

Abstract

Staging the Speculative On Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140 spencer adams A review of Kim Stanley Robinson, New York 2140 (New York: Orbit Books, 2017). Cited in the text as ny. In a chapter titled “Capital Sinks,” Ashley Dawson, in his 2017 book Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change, lays out a sobering vision of the present and future of urban planning and its responses to the effects of climate change. Surveying a range of recent proposals and projects in New York, Mi- ami, and Jakarta, most of which lie somewhere between rhetorically well-couched half measures against city carbon consumption and startling instances of willful blindness to future sea level rise, Daw- son’s account makes painfully clear that the relative inaction or even disregard for the oncoming effects of present city plans is continuing to set the seeds for a catastrophic future. The titular “capital sinks” are the ongoing investments that financiers and city officials regu- larly sink into new seaside buildings, artificial islands, and other planned spaces likely to exacerbate the damage, death, and contam- ination that coastal flooding will almost certainly bring about. To qui parle Vol.

Journal

Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 28, 2019

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