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Sovereignty, Norms, and Exception in Neoliberalism

Sovereignty, Norms, and Exception in Neoliberalism thomas biebricher Neoliberalism and Sovereignty: An Odd Couple? Neoliberalism is notorious not only because of the various effects attributed to its continued "ecological dominance"1 as a real-world phenomenon but also because of the difficulties in pinning it down conceptually. The meanings associated with the term vary between disciplines and subfields, supporters and critics, as well as political and scholarly contexts. As is well known, if the term neoliberalism is invoked at all in political debates, it is never used as a selfdescription but always refers to others, and as such it is usually intended to stigmatize them as egotistic market fundamentalists.2 That the term is easily instrumentalized for purely polemical purposes is in part due to the blurred, unfixed contours of the concept of neoliberalism. For those who think of neoliberalism broadly along such market fundamentalist lines, the aim of this article, namely, to inquire into the notion of sovereignty as a particular aspect of neoliberalism's political theory, may seem all but nonsensical. If neoliberalism can in effect be summed up as a creed of market fundamentalism and a commitment to "turbo-capitalism" that sweeps away everything that stands in the way of a further extension of the market http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences University of Nebraska Press

Sovereignty, Norms, and Exception in Neoliberalism

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1938-8020
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Abstract

thomas biebricher Neoliberalism and Sovereignty: An Odd Couple? Neoliberalism is notorious not only because of the various effects attributed to its continued "ecological dominance"1 as a real-world phenomenon but also because of the difficulties in pinning it down conceptually. The meanings associated with the term vary between disciplines and subfields, supporters and critics, as well as political and scholarly contexts. As is well known, if the term neoliberalism is invoked at all in political debates, it is never used as a selfdescription but always refers to others, and as such it is usually intended to stigmatize them as egotistic market fundamentalists.2 That the term is easily instrumentalized for purely polemical purposes is in part due to the blurred, unfixed contours of the concept of neoliberalism. For those who think of neoliberalism broadly along such market fundamentalist lines, the aim of this article, namely, to inquire into the notion of sovereignty as a particular aspect of neoliberalism's political theory, may seem all but nonsensical. If neoliberalism can in effect be summed up as a creed of market fundamentalism and a commitment to "turbo-capitalism" that sweeps away everything that stands in the way of a further extension of the market

Journal

Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 9, 2014

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