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Renal-Cell Carcinoma

Renal-Cell Carcinoma Renal-cell carcinoma is characterized by a lack of early-warning signs (which results in a high proportion of patients with metastases), diverse clinical manifestations, and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and there is a potential role for immunomodulation in the inhibition of tumor growth. In this review we discuss recent developments in epidemiology, histologic classification, tumor biology, methods of diagnosis and staging, surgical techniques, and immunotherapy for patients with metastatic disease. Epidemiology Renal-cell carcinoma accounts for 2 percent of all cancers.1 Its incidence varies among countries by a factor of 20 among men and by a factor of 10 among women, . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England Journal of Medicine The New England Journal of Medicine

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Publisher
The New England Journal of Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0028-4793
eISSN
1533-4406
DOI
10.1056/NEJM199609193351207
pmid
8778606
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Renal-cell carcinoma is characterized by a lack of early-warning signs (which results in a high proportion of patients with metastases), diverse clinical manifestations, and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and there is a potential role for immunomodulation in the inhibition of tumor growth. In this review we discuss recent developments in epidemiology, histologic classification, tumor biology, methods of diagnosis and staging, surgical techniques, and immunotherapy for patients with metastatic disease. Epidemiology Renal-cell carcinoma accounts for 2 percent of all cancers.1 Its incidence varies among countries by a factor of 20 among men and by a factor of 10 among women, . . .

Journal

The New England Journal of MedicineThe New England Journal of Medicine

Published: Sep 19, 1996

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