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What Makes People Hot? Applying the Situational Theory of Problem Solving to Hot-Issue Publics

What Makes People Hot? Applying the Situational Theory of Problem Solving to Hot-Issue Publics Using a controversial issue that has drawn massive media coverage in South Korea, the government decision to resume imports of US beef, this study tested the applicability of the Situational Theory of Problem Solving (STOPS) to the rise of a hot-issue public. A survey of 300 respondents explored the perceptual, cognitive, and motivational antecedents of active information behaviors. Results suggest that the STOPS applies well to this unique sociopolitical situation, and that the theory works cross-culturally not only in the United States, but also in South Korea. In addition, we examined the role of cross-situational characteristics in detail, looking at whether political interest, prior experience in protest, and other sociodemographics could affect situational perceptions and cognitive frames. Theoretical and practical implications for future research and practices are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

What Makes People Hot? Applying the Situational Theory of Problem Solving to Hot-Issue Publics

What Makes People Hot? Applying the Situational Theory of Problem Solving to Hot-Issue Publics

Abstract

Using a controversial issue that has drawn massive media coverage in South Korea, the government decision to resume imports of US beef, this study tested the applicability of the Situational Theory of Problem Solving (STOPS) to the rise of a hot-issue public. A survey of 300 respondents explored the perceptual, cognitive, and motivational antecedents of active information behaviors. Results suggest that the STOPS applies well to this unique sociopolitical situation, and that the theory works...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1080/1062726X.2012.626133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using a controversial issue that has drawn massive media coverage in South Korea, the government decision to resume imports of US beef, this study tested the applicability of the Situational Theory of Problem Solving (STOPS) to the rise of a hot-issue public. A survey of 300 respondents explored the perceptual, cognitive, and motivational antecedents of active information behaviors. Results suggest that the STOPS applies well to this unique sociopolitical situation, and that the theory works cross-culturally not only in the United States, but also in South Korea. In addition, we examined the role of cross-situational characteristics in detail, looking at whether political interest, prior experience in protest, and other sociodemographics could affect situational perceptions and cognitive frames. Theoretical and practical implications for future research and practices are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2012

References