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What's in a Name?

What's in a Name? WHAT'S IN A NAME? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond by Patricia Hill Collins LACK WOMEN ARE AT A DECISION POINT that lie space via books, movies, and print media B in many ways mirrors that faced by proved invigorating. But in increasingly com­ Mrican Americans as a collectivity. Building petitive global markets where anything that on the pathbreaking works by Toni Cade sells will be sold regardless of the conse­ Bambara, Ntozake Shange, Angela Davis, quences, black women's "voices" now flood Toni Morrison, June Jordan, Alice Walker, the market. Like other commodities Audre Lorde and other black women who exchanged in capitalist markets, surplus "broke silence" in the 1970s, Mrican Ameri­ cheapens value, and the fad of today can women in the 1980s and 1990s devel­ becomes the nostalgic memory of tomorrow. oped a "voice," a self-defined, collective While a public voice initially proved dan­ black women's standpoint about black wom­ gerous, black women's coming to voice ironi­ anhood (Collins 1990). Moreover, black cally fostered the emergence of a new chal­ women used this standpoint to "talk back" lenge. The new public safe space provided by concerning black women's representation in black women's success allowed longstanding dominant discourses (hooks http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Black Scholar Taylor & Francis

What's in a Name?

The Black Scholar , Volume 26 (1): 9 – Dec 1, 1996

What's in a Name?

The Black Scholar , Volume 26 (1): 9 – Dec 1, 1996

Abstract

WHAT'S IN A NAME? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond by Patricia Hill Collins LACK WOMEN ARE AT A DECISION POINT that lie space via books, movies, and print media B in many ways mirrors that faced by proved invigorating. But in increasingly com­ Mrican Americans as a collectivity. Building petitive global markets where anything that on the pathbreaking works by Toni Cade sells will be sold regardless of the conse­ Bambara, Ntozake Shange, Angela Davis, quences, black women's "voices" now flood Toni Morrison, June Jordan, Alice Walker, the market. Like other commodities Audre Lorde and other black women who exchanged in capitalist markets, surplus "broke silence" in the 1970s, Mrican Ameri­ cheapens value, and the fad of today can women in the 1980s and 1990s devel­ becomes the nostalgic memory of tomorrow. oped a "voice," a self-defined, collective While a public voice initially proved dan­ black women's standpoint about black wom­ gerous, black women's coming to voice ironi­ anhood (Collins 1990). Moreover, black cally fostered the emergence of a new chal­ women used this standpoint to "talk back" lenge. The new public safe space provided by concerning black women's representation in black women's success allowed longstanding dominant discourses (hooks

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References (19)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1996 The Black World Foundation
ISSN
2162-5387
eISSN
0006-4246
DOI
10.1080/00064246.1996.11430765
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WHAT'S IN A NAME? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond by Patricia Hill Collins LACK WOMEN ARE AT A DECISION POINT that lie space via books, movies, and print media B in many ways mirrors that faced by proved invigorating. But in increasingly com­ Mrican Americans as a collectivity. Building petitive global markets where anything that on the pathbreaking works by Toni Cade sells will be sold regardless of the conse­ Bambara, Ntozake Shange, Angela Davis, quences, black women's "voices" now flood Toni Morrison, June Jordan, Alice Walker, the market. Like other commodities Audre Lorde and other black women who exchanged in capitalist markets, surplus "broke silence" in the 1970s, Mrican Ameri­ cheapens value, and the fad of today can women in the 1980s and 1990s devel­ becomes the nostalgic memory of tomorrow. oped a "voice," a self-defined, collective While a public voice initially proved dan­ black women's standpoint about black wom­ gerous, black women's coming to voice ironi­ anhood (Collins 1990). Moreover, black cally fostered the emergence of a new chal­ women used this standpoint to "talk back" lenge. The new public safe space provided by concerning black women's representation in black women's success allowed longstanding dominant discourses (hooks

Journal

The Black ScholarTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 1996

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