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Warm-Soup Proximity: The Spatiality of Eldercare in Hyper-Aged Japanese Society

Warm-Soup Proximity: The Spatiality of Eldercare in Hyper-Aged Japanese Society Abstract Why do some people choose to live close to their elderly parents and how do they make sense of it? In Japan, multigenerational co-residence, a cornerstone of eldercare, has been replaced by a residential typology called kinkyo, living nearby. The optimal distance between the homes of family members, defined by the ability to deliver a bowl of soup before it gets cold, is considered a strategy to tackle the population aging. The purpose of this paper is to present a critical assessment of the intergenerational proximity which points to the need for further investigation of the role geographical distancing plays in future city planning. The qualitative data derived from individual narratives of four married daughters in Tokyo were obtained via online and mobile instant messaging interviews, through which real-life kinkyo situations are illustrated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Warm-Soup Proximity: The Spatiality of Eldercare in Hyper-Aged Japanese Society

Architecture and Culture , Volume 10 (1): 17 – Jan 2, 2022

Warm-Soup Proximity: The Spatiality of Eldercare in Hyper-Aged Japanese Society

Architecture and Culture , Volume 10 (1): 17 – Jan 2, 2022

Abstract

Abstract Why do some people choose to live close to their elderly parents and how do they make sense of it? In Japan, multigenerational co-residence, a cornerstone of eldercare, has been replaced by a residential typology called kinkyo, living nearby. The optimal distance between the homes of family members, defined by the ability to deliver a bowl of soup before it gets cold, is considered a strategy to tackle the population aging. The purpose of this paper is to present a critical assessment of the intergenerational proximity which points to the need for further investigation of the role geographical distancing plays in future city planning. The qualitative data derived from individual narratives of four married daughters in Tokyo were obtained via online and mobile instant messaging interviews, through which real-life kinkyo situations are illustrated.

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References (36)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2021.2017553
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Why do some people choose to live close to their elderly parents and how do they make sense of it? In Japan, multigenerational co-residence, a cornerstone of eldercare, has been replaced by a residential typology called kinkyo, living nearby. The optimal distance between the homes of family members, defined by the ability to deliver a bowl of soup before it gets cold, is considered a strategy to tackle the population aging. The purpose of this paper is to present a critical assessment of the intergenerational proximity which points to the need for further investigation of the role geographical distancing plays in future city planning. The qualitative data derived from individual narratives of four married daughters in Tokyo were obtained via online and mobile instant messaging interviews, through which real-life kinkyo situations are illustrated.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2022

Keywords: Japan; population aging; informal care; kinkyo; residential proximity; city planning

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