Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Vive la France! Vive la République? The Cultural Construction of French Identity at the World Exhibitions in Paris 1855–1900

Vive la France! Vive la République? The Cultural Construction of French Identity at the World... Abstract This article analyses how the world exhibitions were instrumentalised for national identity-building in 19th-century France. It argues that they probably strengthened a broadly consensual conception of a superior French culture and civilising mission. In contrast, it is doubtful whether the Second Empire and the Third Republic succeeded in hijacking them to sustain their political visions of the French nation. The exhibitions crystallised criticism of the two political systems, and vociferous debates about their nature and ideological content took place in the Republic. They also helped to strengthen other, sometimes conflicting identities, such as region and class, emphasising the cultural and political diversity of France. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png National Identities Taylor & Francis

Vive la France! Vive la République? The Cultural Construction of French Identity at the World Exhibitions in Paris 1855–1900

National Identities , Volume 1 (3): 18 – Nov 1, 1999
18 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/vive-la-france-vive-la-r-publique-the-cultural-construction-of-french-lX0cNQF2q3

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9907
eISSN
1460-8944
DOI
10.1080/14608944.1999.9728113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This article analyses how the world exhibitions were instrumentalised for national identity-building in 19th-century France. It argues that they probably strengthened a broadly consensual conception of a superior French culture and civilising mission. In contrast, it is doubtful whether the Second Empire and the Third Republic succeeded in hijacking them to sustain their political visions of the French nation. The exhibitions crystallised criticism of the two political systems, and vociferous debates about their nature and ideological content took place in the Republic. They also helped to strengthen other, sometimes conflicting identities, such as region and class, emphasising the cultural and political diversity of France.

Journal

National IdentitiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.