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Utopia’s Bubbles: Pneumatic Architecture of the 1960s and 1970s as a Vehicle for Urban Exhibitionism

Utopia’s Bubbles: Pneumatic Architecture of the 1960s and 1970s as a Vehicle for Urban Exhibitionism AbstractThis paper investigates the “exhibitionist” nature of pneumatic architecture of the 1960s and 1970s and its relationship to the political utopianism of that time. In exploring the causes of its emergence and sudden demise during an era marked by deep political tensions, the paper looks at some of the contradictory characteristics of the inhabitable pneumatic sphere: it is tense but playful, hermetic but transparent, self-contained but dependent. The capacity of captured air to reveal “other airs” is pursued by making use of Peter Sloterdijk’s notion of explication, in an exploration that argues ultimately for a renewed attitude towards air: one that creates “other airs” not by sealing them off from the one in which we live, but by bringing them temporarily into existence within it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Utopia’s Bubbles: Pneumatic Architecture of the 1960s and 1970s as a Vehicle for Urban Exhibitionism

Architecture and Culture , Volume 3 (2): 15 – May 4, 2015

Utopia’s Bubbles: Pneumatic Architecture of the 1960s and 1970s as a Vehicle for Urban Exhibitionism

Architecture and Culture , Volume 3 (2): 15 – May 4, 2015

Abstract

AbstractThis paper investigates the “exhibitionist” nature of pneumatic architecture of the 1960s and 1970s and its relationship to the political utopianism of that time. In exploring the causes of its emergence and sudden demise during an era marked by deep political tensions, the paper looks at some of the contradictory characteristics of the inhabitable pneumatic sphere: it is tense but playful, hermetic but transparent, self-contained but dependent. The capacity of captured air to reveal “other airs” is pursued by making use of Peter Sloterdijk’s notion of explication, in an exploration that argues ultimately for a renewed attitude towards air: one that creates “other airs” not by sealing them off from the one in which we live, but by bringing them temporarily into existence within it.

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References (20)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2015.1067032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper investigates the “exhibitionist” nature of pneumatic architecture of the 1960s and 1970s and its relationship to the political utopianism of that time. In exploring the causes of its emergence and sudden demise during an era marked by deep political tensions, the paper looks at some of the contradictory characteristics of the inhabitable pneumatic sphere: it is tense but playful, hermetic but transparent, self-contained but dependent. The capacity of captured air to reveal “other airs” is pursued by making use of Peter Sloterdijk’s notion of explication, in an exploration that argues ultimately for a renewed attitude towards air: one that creates “other airs” not by sealing them off from the one in which we live, but by bringing them temporarily into existence within it.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 4, 2015

Keywords: air; atmosphere; pneumatic architecture; Peter Sloterdijk; explication

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