Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Unquiet spirits: death writing in contemporary fiction

Unquiet spirits: death writing in contemporary fiction Textual Practice 23(3), 2009, 463 – 479 Alice Bennett Unquiet spirits: death writing in contemporary fiction A biography and a life belong to two quite dissimilar categories. The Death of the Author, Gilbert Adair When the narrator of Gilbert Adair’s novel, Leopold Sfax, makes this observation about the difference between a life and a biography, he adds his voice to a tradition of distinguishing living life and writing about life that includes Kierkegaard and Sartre. The dissimilarity of these categories is generally located in retrospective narration’s slant from the present to the past, which reshapes events through their retelling. However, Sfax’s remark also distinguishes between the form of the biography and of the life: Adair’s novel is called The Death of the Author, with a play on the concept of a Life – of a saint, maybe, or a literary life like Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson – among the allusions in its title. Death writing is opposed to life writing, even as a lived life is set apart from a written biography. In Adair’s novel, death writing is also dead writing with the fiction’s investigation of self-authorship hanging on its posthumous composition. If the opposite of a life http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Textual Practice Taylor & Francis

Unquiet spirits: death writing in contemporary fiction

Textual Practice , Volume 23 (3): 17 – Jun 1, 2009
17 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/unquiet-spirits-death-writing-in-contemporary-fiction-IDCxsldVJL

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1470-1308
eISSN
0950-236X
DOI
10.1080/09502360902868787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Textual Practice 23(3), 2009, 463 – 479 Alice Bennett Unquiet spirits: death writing in contemporary fiction A biography and a life belong to two quite dissimilar categories. The Death of the Author, Gilbert Adair When the narrator of Gilbert Adair’s novel, Leopold Sfax, makes this observation about the difference between a life and a biography, he adds his voice to a tradition of distinguishing living life and writing about life that includes Kierkegaard and Sartre. The dissimilarity of these categories is generally located in retrospective narration’s slant from the present to the past, which reshapes events through their retelling. However, Sfax’s remark also distinguishes between the form of the biography and of the life: Adair’s novel is called The Death of the Author, with a play on the concept of a Life – of a saint, maybe, or a literary life like Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson – among the allusions in its title. Death writing is opposed to life writing, even as a lived life is set apart from a written biography. In Adair’s novel, death writing is also dead writing with the fiction’s investigation of self-authorship hanging on its posthumous composition. If the opposite of a life

Journal

Textual PracticeTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.