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Uncertain Architecture: Transforming Normativity through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice

Uncertain Architecture: Transforming Normativity through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice Abstract Drawing on the philosophies of Mbembe, Butler, Deleuze and Guattari, and a range of interdisciplinary authors, this article argues that history, which is the perceptual field through which our visions of the world are constructed, can actively hide or legitimize violence by creating fixed, borderized senses of identity. As part of this construction, architecture should, I contend, work to provoke unstable visions of the world: it should be “uncertain.” Through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, I explore how the use of uncertain, bodily movement through space can resist grand narratives and uncritical histories. Through uncertainty, the memorial reconfigures the normative interpretive horizons we bring to our lived encounters to become less fixed and thereby less amenable to violence. Uncertain architecture offers an original way to think through the challenges of world-making in an increasingly compartmentalized and enclosed world. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Uncertain Architecture: Transforming Normativity through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice

Architecture and Culture , Volume 9 (4): 23 – Oct 2, 2021

Uncertain Architecture: Transforming Normativity through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice

Architecture and Culture , Volume 9 (4): 23 – Oct 2, 2021

Abstract

Abstract Drawing on the philosophies of Mbembe, Butler, Deleuze and Guattari, and a range of interdisciplinary authors, this article argues that history, which is the perceptual field through which our visions of the world are constructed, can actively hide or legitimize violence by creating fixed, borderized senses of identity. As part of this construction, architecture should, I contend, work to provoke unstable visions of the world: it should be “uncertain.” Through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, I explore how the use of uncertain, bodily movement through space can resist grand narratives and uncritical histories. Through uncertainty, the memorial reconfigures the normative interpretive horizons we bring to our lived encounters to become less fixed and thereby less amenable to violence. Uncertain architecture offers an original way to think through the challenges of world-making in an increasingly compartmentalized and enclosed world.

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References (37)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2021.1924553
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Drawing on the philosophies of Mbembe, Butler, Deleuze and Guattari, and a range of interdisciplinary authors, this article argues that history, which is the perceptual field through which our visions of the world are constructed, can actively hide or legitimize violence by creating fixed, borderized senses of identity. As part of this construction, architecture should, I contend, work to provoke unstable visions of the world: it should be “uncertain.” Through the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, I explore how the use of uncertain, bodily movement through space can resist grand narratives and uncritical histories. Through uncertainty, the memorial reconfigures the normative interpretive horizons we bring to our lived encounters to become less fixed and thereby less amenable to violence. Uncertain architecture offers an original way to think through the challenges of world-making in an increasingly compartmentalized and enclosed world.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2021

Keywords: architecture; identity; violence; memory; history; poetics; body

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