Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

To Share or Not? A Critical View on Personal Mobility

To Share or Not? A Critical View on Personal Mobility AbstractIn their book Reinventing the Automobile, William Mitchell, Chris Borroni-Bird, and Larry Burns unravel a fascinating vision for technologically driven, shared, on-demand, mobility systems. Today, shared mobility-on-demand systems are one of the most rapidly growing sectors of urban transport, yet, the average shared vehicle is often as inefficient as a privately owned one. In this essay, I argue that the question of sharing versus owning is one that depends less on planning, technology, and operations, as the authors of the book suggest, and more on contextual factors such as urban form, land use distribution, and user behaviour. I organize my argument in three parts. First, I provide a definition of cost of shared mobility that serves as a basis for comparing shared with privately owned mobility. Next, I critique three common arguments in support of mobility-on-demand systems. Finally, I frame the question of sharing versus owning in a generalized yet addressable manner and I suggest new methodological directions to address it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

To Share or Not? A Critical View on Personal Mobility

Architecture and Culture , Volume 7 (3): 19 – Sep 2, 2019

To Share or Not? A Critical View on Personal Mobility

Architecture and Culture , Volume 7 (3): 19 – Sep 2, 2019

Abstract

AbstractIn their book Reinventing the Automobile, William Mitchell, Chris Borroni-Bird, and Larry Burns unravel a fascinating vision for technologically driven, shared, on-demand, mobility systems. Today, shared mobility-on-demand systems are one of the most rapidly growing sectors of urban transport, yet, the average shared vehicle is often as inefficient as a privately owned one. In this essay, I argue that the question of sharing versus owning is one that depends less on planning, technology, and operations, as the authors of the book suggest, and more on contextual factors such as urban form, land use distribution, and user behaviour. I organize my argument in three parts. First, I provide a definition of cost of shared mobility that serves as a basis for comparing shared with privately owned mobility. Next, I critique three common arguments in support of mobility-on-demand systems. Finally, I frame the question of sharing versus owning in a generalized yet addressable manner and I suggest new methodological directions to address it.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/to-share-or-not-a-critical-view-on-personal-mobility-02zkAAW7AZ

References (42)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2019.1653030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn their book Reinventing the Automobile, William Mitchell, Chris Borroni-Bird, and Larry Burns unravel a fascinating vision for technologically driven, shared, on-demand, mobility systems. Today, shared mobility-on-demand systems are one of the most rapidly growing sectors of urban transport, yet, the average shared vehicle is often as inefficient as a privately owned one. In this essay, I argue that the question of sharing versus owning is one that depends less on planning, technology, and operations, as the authors of the book suggest, and more on contextual factors such as urban form, land use distribution, and user behaviour. I organize my argument in three parts. First, I provide a definition of cost of shared mobility that serves as a basis for comparing shared with privately owned mobility. Next, I critique three common arguments in support of mobility-on-demand systems. Finally, I frame the question of sharing versus owning in a generalized yet addressable manner and I suggest new methodological directions to address it.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 2, 2019

Keywords: shared mobility; intelligent transportation; common pool resources; bike-sharing; mobility-on-demand; smart cities; autonomous vehicles; urban dynamics

There are no references for this article.