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The Vernacular International: Heimat, Modernism and the Global Market in Early Twentieth-Century Germany

The Vernacular International: Heimat, Modernism and the Global Market in Early Twentieth-Century... This article proposes a reconceptualisation of regionalism, nationalism and globalisation as simultaneous and causally connected phenomena, which first peaked in the early decades of the twentieth century. Focusing on figures such as Hermann Muthesius, Fritz Schumacher and others active in the Deutscher Werkbund, it examines how competition in the global market inspired a search for modern yet uniquely national forms that derived their 'authenticity' from vernacular culture. Yet paradoxically, the visual vocabulary of Heimat was frequently inspired by English and American models. This article interprets the aesthetic and political translations which the peripatetics of localism entailed, and shows how consumer goods 'made in Germany' came to be invested with a sense of cultural mission. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png National Identities Taylor & Francis

The Vernacular International: Heimat, Modernism and the Global Market in Early Twentieth-Century Germany

National Identities , Volume 4 (1): 24 – Mar 1, 2002
24 pages

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References (63)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9907
eISSN
1460-8944
DOI
10.1080/14608940120115675
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article proposes a reconceptualisation of regionalism, nationalism and globalisation as simultaneous and causally connected phenomena, which first peaked in the early decades of the twentieth century. Focusing on figures such as Hermann Muthesius, Fritz Schumacher and others active in the Deutscher Werkbund, it examines how competition in the global market inspired a search for modern yet uniquely national forms that derived their 'authenticity' from vernacular culture. Yet paradoxically, the visual vocabulary of Heimat was frequently inspired by English and American models. This article interprets the aesthetic and political translations which the peripatetics of localism entailed, and shows how consumer goods 'made in Germany' came to be invested with a sense of cultural mission.

Journal

National IdentitiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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