Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The University of Nonstop Society: Campus Planning, Lounge Space, and Incessant Productivity

The University of Nonstop Society: Campus Planning, Lounge Space, and Incessant Productivity Abstract The University of Birmingham, UK, has been at the forefront of the last decade’s marketization of higher education in England. It has invested massively in its estate, and we examine the ideologies at work in its new masterplan and architecture. We account for the campus’s history. We then review the idea of lounge space – around which it has been reconfigured – and focus on three projects: The Alan Walters Building, a new Library, and the so-called Green Heart. We examine the ideological outlook of the campus and its new architecture to draw conclusions about the ideas of contemporary society and economy that they represent. The trajectory of its masterplanning and architecture inscribe a shift from a postwar liberal view of higher education to a contemporary marketized one under the economic, social and cultural condition characterized as neoliberalism. It now constitutes what we call the university of nonstop society. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

The University of Nonstop Society: Campus Planning, Lounge Space, and Incessant Productivity

Architecture and Culture , Volume 9 (1): 29 – Jan 2, 2021

The University of Nonstop Society: Campus Planning, Lounge Space, and Incessant Productivity

Architecture and Culture , Volume 9 (1): 29 – Jan 2, 2021

Abstract

Abstract The University of Birmingham, UK, has been at the forefront of the last decade’s marketization of higher education in England. It has invested massively in its estate, and we examine the ideologies at work in its new masterplan and architecture. We account for the campus’s history. We then review the idea of lounge space – around which it has been reconfigured – and focus on three projects: The Alan Walters Building, a new Library, and the so-called Green Heart. We examine the ideological outlook of the campus and its new architecture to draw conclusions about the ideas of contemporary society and economy that they represent. The trajectory of its masterplanning and architecture inscribe a shift from a postwar liberal view of higher education to a contemporary marketized one under the economic, social and cultural condition characterized as neoliberalism. It now constitutes what we call the university of nonstop society.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-university-of-nonstop-society-campus-planning-lounge-space-and-6pV3fAJ1A5

References (64)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2020.1766300
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The University of Birmingham, UK, has been at the forefront of the last decade’s marketization of higher education in England. It has invested massively in its estate, and we examine the ideologies at work in its new masterplan and architecture. We account for the campus’s history. We then review the idea of lounge space – around which it has been reconfigured – and focus on three projects: The Alan Walters Building, a new Library, and the so-called Green Heart. We examine the ideological outlook of the campus and its new architecture to draw conclusions about the ideas of contemporary society and economy that they represent. The trajectory of its masterplanning and architecture inscribe a shift from a postwar liberal view of higher education to a contemporary marketized one under the economic, social and cultural condition characterized as neoliberalism. It now constitutes what we call the university of nonstop society.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2021

Keywords: architecture; urban design; landscape design; lounge space; neoliberalism

There are no references for this article.