Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Twisted Arcade: Unconnected Thoughts on Martin Creed’s Work No. 1059

The Twisted Arcade: Unconnected Thoughts on Martin Creed’s Work No. 1059 AbstractThis paper presents a public commission by artist Martin Creed through an experimental essay form that replicates the structural features of the artwork itself. Creed’s work is entitled Work No. 1059 (Creed has been numbering his artworks sequentially since 1986) and consists of a flight of 104 steps that join two streets in Edinburgh, part of a refurbishment project by Edinburgh City Council and Edinburgh World Heritage. In this essay “walks” from the lowest point on Market Street to the uppermost level on North Bridge, naming as it goes each of the different marble steps sourced from twenty-seven countries. The steps had previously fallen into disuse, and were eventually closed. In 2011, they were reopened as an artwork and a public right of way: The Scotsman Steps. They are encased within an octagonal, turreted stone tower, originally part of The Scotsman Newspaper building. The whole forms part of a Category A-listed structure built in 1899 by architects James Dunn and James Finlay. Commissioning Creed’s Work No. 1059 was at the instigation of The Fruitmarket Gallery, which lies near the bottom entrance to the steps. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

The Twisted Arcade: Unconnected Thoughts on Martin Creed’s Work No. 1059

Architecture and Culture , Volume 3 (2): 25 – May 4, 2015

The Twisted Arcade: Unconnected Thoughts on Martin Creed’s Work No. 1059

Architecture and Culture , Volume 3 (2): 25 – May 4, 2015

Abstract

AbstractThis paper presents a public commission by artist Martin Creed through an experimental essay form that replicates the structural features of the artwork itself. Creed’s work is entitled Work No. 1059 (Creed has been numbering his artworks sequentially since 1986) and consists of a flight of 104 steps that join two streets in Edinburgh, part of a refurbishment project by Edinburgh City Council and Edinburgh World Heritage. In this essay “walks” from the lowest point on Market Street to the uppermost level on North Bridge, naming as it goes each of the different marble steps sourced from twenty-seven countries. The steps had previously fallen into disuse, and were eventually closed. In 2011, they were reopened as an artwork and a public right of way: The Scotsman Steps. They are encased within an octagonal, turreted stone tower, originally part of The Scotsman Newspaper building. The whole forms part of a Category A-listed structure built in 1899 by architects James Dunn and James Finlay. Commissioning Creed’s Work No. 1059 was at the instigation of The Fruitmarket Gallery, which lies near the bottom entrance to the steps.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-twisted-arcade-unconnected-thoughts-on-martin-creed-s-work-no-1059-5b1kAxwOwo

References (4)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2015.1067039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper presents a public commission by artist Martin Creed through an experimental essay form that replicates the structural features of the artwork itself. Creed’s work is entitled Work No. 1059 (Creed has been numbering his artworks sequentially since 1986) and consists of a flight of 104 steps that join two streets in Edinburgh, part of a refurbishment project by Edinburgh City Council and Edinburgh World Heritage. In this essay “walks” from the lowest point on Market Street to the uppermost level on North Bridge, naming as it goes each of the different marble steps sourced from twenty-seven countries. The steps had previously fallen into disuse, and were eventually closed. In 2011, they were reopened as an artwork and a public right of way: The Scotsman Steps. They are encased within an octagonal, turreted stone tower, originally part of The Scotsman Newspaper building. The whole forms part of a Category A-listed structure built in 1899 by architects James Dunn and James Finlay. Commissioning Creed’s Work No. 1059 was at the instigation of The Fruitmarket Gallery, which lies near the bottom entrance to the steps.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 4, 2015

Keywords: Martin Creed; Scotsman Steps; public art; Edinburgh; picturesque

There are no references for this article.