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The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice

The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice Book reviews 461 The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice, edited by Peter Reason and Hilary Bradbury-Huan, London, Sage, 2013, 752 pp., £40.00 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-4462-7114-8 The proliferation of Action research handbooks can confuse, so to be clear: The Handbook of Action Research first appeared in 2001; the Second Edition (2008) of this text was substantially re-written and included the publisher’s name in its title. The title under review here is a much cheaper paperback version of the 2008 edition. It is not to be confused with the The Sage Handbook of Educational Action Research (Noffke and Somekh 2009). Reason and Bradbury-Huan’s (2013) edition is very wide ranging in its scope and coverage. The book starts by defining action research as ‘a family of practices of living inquiry’ and it quickly becomes evident that the action research family is extremely large and disparate, embracing a sizeable number of the world’s poorest people; it is generous, articulate, politically engaged and above all, outward-looking and inter- national. Whilst the family acknowledges ancestors such as Orlando Fals-borda, Paulo Freire and Kurt Lewin, it includes present-day elders, many of whom have contributed chapters; it is forward-looking and expansive and, in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Research and Method in Education Taylor & Francis

The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice

The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice


Abstract

Book reviews 461 The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice, edited by Peter Reason and Hilary Bradbury-Huan, London, Sage, 2013, 752 pp., £40.00 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-4462-7114-8 The proliferation of Action research handbooks can confuse, so to be clear: The Handbook of Action Research first appeared in 2001; the Second Edition (2008) of this text was substantially re-written and included the publisher’s name in its title. The title under review here is a much cheaper paperback version of the 2008 edition. It is not to be confused with the The Sage Handbook of Educational Action Research (Noffke and Somekh 2009). Reason and Bradbury-Huan’s (2013) edition is very wide ranging in its scope and coverage. The book starts by defining action research as ‘a family of practices of living inquiry’ and it quickly becomes evident that the action research family is extremely large and disparate, embracing a sizeable number of the world’s poorest people; it is generous, articulate, politically engaged and above all, outward-looking and inter- national. Whilst the family acknowledges ancestors such as Orlando Fals-borda, Paulo Freire and Kurt Lewin, it includes present-day elders, many of whom have contributed chapters; it is forward-looking and expansive and, in

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Tim Cain
ISSN
1743-7288
eISSN
1743-727X
DOI
10.1080/1743727X.2014.937521
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book reviews 461 The Sage handbook of action research: participative inquiry and practice, edited by Peter Reason and Hilary Bradbury-Huan, London, Sage, 2013, 752 pp., £40.00 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-4462-7114-8 The proliferation of Action research handbooks can confuse, so to be clear: The Handbook of Action Research first appeared in 2001; the Second Edition (2008) of this text was substantially re-written and included the publisher’s name in its title. The title under review here is a much cheaper paperback version of the 2008 edition. It is not to be confused with the The Sage Handbook of Educational Action Research (Noffke and Somekh 2009). Reason and Bradbury-Huan’s (2013) edition is very wide ranging in its scope and coverage. The book starts by defining action research as ‘a family of practices of living inquiry’ and it quickly becomes evident that the action research family is extremely large and disparate, embracing a sizeable number of the world’s poorest people; it is generous, articulate, politically engaged and above all, outward-looking and inter- national. Whilst the family acknowledges ancestors such as Orlando Fals-borda, Paulo Freire and Kurt Lewin, it includes present-day elders, many of whom have contributed chapters; it is forward-looking and expansive and, in

Journal

International Journal of Research and Method in EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2014

There are no references for this article.