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The Role of Technology, Government, Law, And Social Trust on E-Commerce Adoption

The Role of Technology, Government, Law, And Social Trust on E-Commerce Adoption This research explores critical factors impacting e-commerce adoption at the country-level. Due to the steady growth in e-commerce trade volumes in recent years, governments of many countries are focused on improving their share in the overall global trade. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the important drivers of e-commerce adoption at a country level rather than just individual and organizational levels. In addition to social trust, the model presented includes technological, governmental, and cultural factors as antecedents of the e-commerce adoption. Secondary data from seventy countries are collected to empirically evaluate the hypotheses presented among the factors of the research model. The hypotheses are assessed using PLS analytical procedures. We found that connectivity and technological efficacy directly influence e-commerce. We also found that legal environment and connectivity impact social trust which in its turn affects uncertainty avoidance. Our results are very important for decision makers. According to the results of our study, policy makers need to consider their country’s institutional, technological, and cultural environments. We discuss the implications of our results for researchers and practitioners. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Global Information Technology Management Taylor & Francis

The Role of Technology, Government, Law, And Social Trust on E-Commerce Adoption

The Role of Technology, Government, Law, And Social Trust on E-Commerce Adoption

Abstract

This research explores critical factors impacting e-commerce adoption at the country-level. Due to the steady growth in e-commerce trade volumes in recent years, governments of many countries are focused on improving their share in the overall global trade. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the important drivers of e-commerce adoption at a country level rather than just individual and organizational levels. In addition to social trust, the model presented includes technological,...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2022 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
ISSN
2333-6846
eISSN
1097-198X
DOI
10.1080/1097198X.2022.2094183
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research explores critical factors impacting e-commerce adoption at the country-level. Due to the steady growth in e-commerce trade volumes in recent years, governments of many countries are focused on improving their share in the overall global trade. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the important drivers of e-commerce adoption at a country level rather than just individual and organizational levels. In addition to social trust, the model presented includes technological, governmental, and cultural factors as antecedents of the e-commerce adoption. Secondary data from seventy countries are collected to empirically evaluate the hypotheses presented among the factors of the research model. The hypotheses are assessed using PLS analytical procedures. We found that connectivity and technological efficacy directly influence e-commerce. We also found that legal environment and connectivity impact social trust which in its turn affects uncertainty avoidance. Our results are very important for decision makers. According to the results of our study, policy makers need to consider their country’s institutional, technological, and cultural environments. We discuss the implications of our results for researchers and practitioners.

Journal

Journal of Global Information Technology ManagementTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 3, 2022

Keywords: E-commerce adoption; cross-border e-commerce; social trust; cross-country

References