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The Role of Emotional Response during an H1N1 Influenza Pandemic on a College Campus

The Role of Emotional Response during an H1N1 Influenza Pandemic on a College Campus This study investigates how both positive and negative emotions relate to stakeholders' attributions of crisis responsibility, relational trust, and willingness to engage in crisis-related information seeking from the organization. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze data obtained from a survey of 429 students in a university that experienced a large H1N1 influenza outbreak. Students felt several positive emotions more frequently than negative emotions during a flu pandemic. Crisis responsibility was associated with both negative and positive emotions, and these emotions were significant mediators between crisis responsibility and both relational trust and willingness to seek information from the organization in a crisis. Implications of these findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

The Role of Emotional Response during an H1N1 Influenza Pandemic on a College Campus

The Role of Emotional Response during an H1N1 Influenza Pandemic on a College Campus

Abstract

This study investigates how both positive and negative emotions relate to stakeholders' attributions of crisis responsibility, relational trust, and willingness to engage in crisis-related information seeking from the organization. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze data obtained from a survey of 429 students in a university that experienced a large H1N1 influenza outbreak. Students felt several positive emotions more frequently than negative emotions during a flu...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1080/1062726X.2013.739100
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigates how both positive and negative emotions relate to stakeholders' attributions of crisis responsibility, relational trust, and willingness to engage in crisis-related information seeking from the organization. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze data obtained from a survey of 429 students in a university that experienced a large H1N1 influenza outbreak. Students felt several positive emotions more frequently than negative emotions during a flu pandemic. Crisis responsibility was associated with both negative and positive emotions, and these emotions were significant mediators between crisis responsibility and both relational trust and willingness to seek information from the organization in a crisis. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2013

References