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The Priest, the King and the Street Vendor: Urban Allegories in Saul Steinberg’s Strada Palas (1966)

The Priest, the King and the Street Vendor: Urban Allegories in Saul Steinberg’s Strada Palas (1966) AbstractAll parades are gatherings of curious collections, but the parades in the work of the architect-trained artist Saul Steinberg are like no others. In one particular drawing bearing the name of his childhood street, Steinberg intertwines two parades that bring forth recollections of his native Bucharest from the early decades of the twentieth century. Utilizing the focused lens of the festival, I will trace a microhistory where Steinberg constructs an allegorical narrative of the city as parade. While the city-fragment portrayed in the image is the eclectic Bucharest of the 1920s, it also makes larger, more important statements about cities as contested places of power, where the ordinary and the extraordinary, locals and guests inhabit, reclaim and negotiate the same places. The destabilizing condition of the festival is extended to the city as a whole, which thus turns into another parade of colliding, yet intertwined, fragments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

The Priest, the King and the Street Vendor: Urban Allegories in Saul Steinberg’s Strada Palas (1966)

Architecture and Culture , Volume 6 (3): 14 – Sep 2, 2018

The Priest, the King and the Street Vendor: Urban Allegories in Saul Steinberg’s Strada Palas (1966)

Architecture and Culture , Volume 6 (3): 14 – Sep 2, 2018

Abstract

AbstractAll parades are gatherings of curious collections, but the parades in the work of the architect-trained artist Saul Steinberg are like no others. In one particular drawing bearing the name of his childhood street, Steinberg intertwines two parades that bring forth recollections of his native Bucharest from the early decades of the twentieth century. Utilizing the focused lens of the festival, I will trace a microhistory where Steinberg constructs an allegorical narrative of the city as parade. While the city-fragment portrayed in the image is the eclectic Bucharest of the 1920s, it also makes larger, more important statements about cities as contested places of power, where the ordinary and the extraordinary, locals and guests inhabit, reclaim and negotiate the same places. The destabilizing condition of the festival is extended to the city as a whole, which thus turns into another parade of colliding, yet intertwined, fragments.

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References (19)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2018.1525146
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAll parades are gatherings of curious collections, but the parades in the work of the architect-trained artist Saul Steinberg are like no others. In one particular drawing bearing the name of his childhood street, Steinberg intertwines two parades that bring forth recollections of his native Bucharest from the early decades of the twentieth century. Utilizing the focused lens of the festival, I will trace a microhistory where Steinberg constructs an allegorical narrative of the city as parade. While the city-fragment portrayed in the image is the eclectic Bucharest of the 1920s, it also makes larger, more important statements about cities as contested places of power, where the ordinary and the extraordinary, locals and guests inhabit, reclaim and negotiate the same places. The destabilizing condition of the festival is extended to the city as a whole, which thus turns into another parade of colliding, yet intertwined, fragments.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 2, 2018

Keywords: Saul Steinberg; Bucharest; parade; festival; microhistory

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