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The polarization of global container flows by interoceanic canals: geographic coverage and network vulnerability

The polarization of global container flows by interoceanic canals: geographic coverage and... It is widely acknowledged that the two major interoceanic canals of Suez and Panama play a central role in global shipping flows. However, this role has rarely been measured with precision both in terms of the geographic coverage and network topological properties of canal-dependent flows. Based on vessel movement data for containerships, this research clarifies the weight and share of canal-dependent flows globally and at the level of world regions, routes, and ports. It also estimates and maps the effects of removing canal-dependent flows from the network by means of graph-theoretical methods. While main results converge in showing a decreasing importance of canal shipping in the context of growing south-south trade exchanges, certain areas remain more dependent than others, such as Asia, Europe, and North America. The research also underlines factors of port vulnerability across the globe in relation with the two canals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Maritime Policy & Management Taylor & Francis

The polarization of global container flows by interoceanic canals: geographic coverage and network vulnerability

Maritime Policy & Management , Volume 43 (2): 19 – Feb 17, 2016
19 pages

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References (55)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1464-5254
eISSN
0308-8839
DOI
10.1080/03088839.2015.1022612
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is widely acknowledged that the two major interoceanic canals of Suez and Panama play a central role in global shipping flows. However, this role has rarely been measured with precision both in terms of the geographic coverage and network topological properties of canal-dependent flows. Based on vessel movement data for containerships, this research clarifies the weight and share of canal-dependent flows globally and at the level of world regions, routes, and ports. It also estimates and maps the effects of removing canal-dependent flows from the network by means of graph-theoretical methods. While main results converge in showing a decreasing importance of canal shipping in the context of growing south-south trade exchanges, certain areas remain more dependent than others, such as Asia, Europe, and North America. The research also underlines factors of port vulnerability across the globe in relation with the two canals.

Journal

Maritime Policy & ManagementTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 17, 2016

Keywords: cascading failures; complex networks; graph theory; maritime transport; Panama; Suez

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