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The Influence of Gender Composition in Powerful Positions on Public Relations Practitioners' Gender-Related Perceptions

The Influence of Gender Composition in Powerful Positions on Public Relations Practitioners'... This article examines the way women's proportional representation in powerful positions affects practitioners' perceptions of gender differences and evaluation relative to success. This study investigated 2 types of organizations defined by women's proportional representation in powerful positions: male-dominated and gender-integrated. A mail survey was administered among members of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Female respondents perceived larger gender differences and evaluated men more favorably relative to success than male respondents. In particular, female and male respondents in male-dominated organizations were more likely to evaluate men favorably relative to success than practitioners in gender-integrated organizations. Members of the Arthur W. Page Society, who hold executive positions in public relations, also were surveyed to determine whether any difference exists in evaluating their subordinates' performance depending on the gender ratio in powerful positions. Arthur Page respondents in gender-integrated organizations were more likely to evaluate their female subordinates favorably relative to success than those in male-dominated organizations. Results indicate that numerical balancing of women and men affects top communicators' evaluations of female practitioners and decreases income inequity between female and male practitioners. Yet, this study found that a gender balance in powerful positions was not enough to change women's gender-related perceptions. The researchers suggest that in addition to increasing the number of women in power positions, changes in organizational value systems related to gender also must occur before equity for women in public relations is realized. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

The Influence of Gender Composition in Powerful Positions on Public Relations Practitioners' Gender-Related Perceptions

The Influence of Gender Composition in Powerful Positions on Public Relations Practitioners' Gender-Related Perceptions

Abstract

This article examines the way women's proportional representation in powerful positions affects practitioners' perceptions of gender differences and evaluation relative to success. This study investigated 2 types of organizations defined by women's proportional representation in powerful positions: male-dominated and gender-integrated. A mail survey was administered among members of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Female respondents perceived larger gender...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1207/S1532754XJPRR1403_4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines the way women's proportional representation in powerful positions affects practitioners' perceptions of gender differences and evaluation relative to success. This study investigated 2 types of organizations defined by women's proportional representation in powerful positions: male-dominated and gender-integrated. A mail survey was administered among members of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Female respondents perceived larger gender differences and evaluated men more favorably relative to success than male respondents. In particular, female and male respondents in male-dominated organizations were more likely to evaluate men favorably relative to success than practitioners in gender-integrated organizations. Members of the Arthur W. Page Society, who hold executive positions in public relations, also were surveyed to determine whether any difference exists in evaluating their subordinates' performance depending on the gender ratio in powerful positions. Arthur Page respondents in gender-integrated organizations were more likely to evaluate their female subordinates favorably relative to success than those in male-dominated organizations. Results indicate that numerical balancing of women and men affects top communicators' evaluations of female practitioners and decreases income inequity between female and male practitioners. Yet, this study found that a gender balance in powerful positions was not enough to change women's gender-related perceptions. The researchers suggest that in addition to increasing the number of women in power positions, changes in organizational value systems related to gender also must occur before equity for women in public relations is realized.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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