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The Female Body Politic: Enacting the Architecture of The Book of the City of Ladies

The Female Body Politic: Enacting the Architecture of The Book of the City of Ladies Abstract This visual essay and explanatory text presents my practice-led research focusing on two works by medieval author Christine de Pizan. Conflating the act of writing a book – a thesis against institutional misogyny – with the construction of an imaginary city, the first work, The Book of the City of Ladies, 1405, has been seen as a proto-feminist manifesto. I focus on the under-researched architectural and urban allegory depicted in the text, which imagines a utopia inhabited solely by women and constructed for them by a woman and on the manuscript's accompanying illuminations displaying three different stages of the construction of the city. Inspired by Aristotle’s Politics and revisiting the ancient Greek metaphor, by which a state or society and its institutions are conceived of as a biological human body, in The Book of the Body Politic, 1404, de Pizan offers her version of a medieval political theory, which I connect with her allegorical city. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

The Female Body Politic: Enacting the Architecture of The Book of the City of Ladies

Architecture and Culture , Volume 8 (3-4): 22 – Oct 1, 2020

The Female Body Politic: Enacting the Architecture of The Book of the City of Ladies

Architecture and Culture , Volume 8 (3-4): 22 – Oct 1, 2020

Abstract

Abstract This visual essay and explanatory text presents my practice-led research focusing on two works by medieval author Christine de Pizan. Conflating the act of writing a book – a thesis against institutional misogyny – with the construction of an imaginary city, the first work, The Book of the City of Ladies, 1405, has been seen as a proto-feminist manifesto. I focus on the under-researched architectural and urban allegory depicted in the text, which imagines a utopia inhabited solely by women and constructed for them by a woman and on the manuscript's accompanying illuminations displaying three different stages of the construction of the city. Inspired by Aristotle’s Politics and revisiting the ancient Greek metaphor, by which a state or society and its institutions are conceived of as a biological human body, in The Book of the Body Politic, 1404, de Pizan offers her version of a medieval political theory, which I connect with her allegorical city.

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References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2020.1794146
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This visual essay and explanatory text presents my practice-led research focusing on two works by medieval author Christine de Pizan. Conflating the act of writing a book – a thesis against institutional misogyny – with the construction of an imaginary city, the first work, The Book of the City of Ladies, 1405, has been seen as a proto-feminist manifesto. I focus on the under-researched architectural and urban allegory depicted in the text, which imagines a utopia inhabited solely by women and constructed for them by a woman and on the manuscript's accompanying illuminations displaying three different stages of the construction of the city. Inspired by Aristotle’s Politics and revisiting the ancient Greek metaphor, by which a state or society and its institutions are conceived of as a biological human body, in The Book of the Body Politic, 1404, de Pizan offers her version of a medieval political theory, which I connect with her allegorical city.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2020

Keywords: Christine de Pizan; architecture; feminist city; body politic; allegory; practice-led research; digital film

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