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The Ecological Being: Anandgram and the Expanded Leprous Body

The Ecological Being: Anandgram and the Expanded Leprous Body AbstractThis paper establishes a framework for the reading of an ecological identity by focusing on the author’s sabbatical experience working as a medical student with patients at Anandgram – the Village of Joy – in 1991. Anandgram is a leprosy hospital and rehabilitation center situated on the outskirts of Pune, India. It is home to a unique community of outcasts ravaged by the disease. Despite overwhelming odds, these people have overcome the constraints of a singular identity – that of the leper – and reclaimed a productive future for themselves. The ways that Anandgram’s residents have forged new kinds of existence have far-reaching implications for the built environment through their impact on identity, technology, ecology, culture, materiality, and the production of spaces. With this in mind, the aim is to present a portrait of the leprous body not as a machine but as an “ecological being,” a dynamic model of human anatomy that is in continual flux and deeply embedded with the environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

The Ecological Being: Anandgram and the Expanded Leprous Body

Architecture and Culture , Volume 4 (2): 13 – May 3, 2016

The Ecological Being: Anandgram and the Expanded Leprous Body

Architecture and Culture , Volume 4 (2): 13 – May 3, 2016

Abstract

AbstractThis paper establishes a framework for the reading of an ecological identity by focusing on the author’s sabbatical experience working as a medical student with patients at Anandgram – the Village of Joy – in 1991. Anandgram is a leprosy hospital and rehabilitation center situated on the outskirts of Pune, India. It is home to a unique community of outcasts ravaged by the disease. Despite overwhelming odds, these people have overcome the constraints of a singular identity – that of the leper – and reclaimed a productive future for themselves. The ways that Anandgram’s residents have forged new kinds of existence have far-reaching implications for the built environment through their impact on identity, technology, ecology, culture, materiality, and the production of spaces. With this in mind, the aim is to present a portrait of the leprous body not as a machine but as an “ecological being,” a dynamic model of human anatomy that is in continual flux and deeply embedded with the environment.

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References (15)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2016.1179554
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper establishes a framework for the reading of an ecological identity by focusing on the author’s sabbatical experience working as a medical student with patients at Anandgram – the Village of Joy – in 1991. Anandgram is a leprosy hospital and rehabilitation center situated on the outskirts of Pune, India. It is home to a unique community of outcasts ravaged by the disease. Despite overwhelming odds, these people have overcome the constraints of a singular identity – that of the leper – and reclaimed a productive future for themselves. The ways that Anandgram’s residents have forged new kinds of existence have far-reaching implications for the built environment through their impact on identity, technology, ecology, culture, materiality, and the production of spaces. With this in mind, the aim is to present a portrait of the leprous body not as a machine but as an “ecological being,” a dynamic model of human anatomy that is in continual flux and deeply embedded with the environment.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 3, 2016

Keywords: ecological being; ecology; anatomy; leprosy; Anandgram

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