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TeleBCI: remote user training, monitoring, and communication with an evoked-potential brain-computer interface

TeleBCI: remote user training, monitoring, and communication with an evoked-potential... Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can serve as a type of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). One hindrance to BCI adoption is the complexity of providing training and support for users. This paper describes the teleBCI interface used to train end-users in the operation of a virtual keyboard using an evoked potential BCI. Fifteen patients with motor neuron disease and their communication partners were included in the study. Teams completed 8 sessions of P300 BCI training virtually with the researcher. Over time, teams required less help to complete physical, computer, and BCI-specific tasks associated with device use. A subset of users experienced improved performance over sessions, progressing to utilize the full functionality of the speller and communicate with a nurse partner over a telemedicine interface. Integration of telemedicine in ALS care provides new opportunities for how BCI-AAC are deployed and used. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

TeleBCI: remote user training, monitoring, and communication with an evoked-potential brain-computer interface

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 7 (3-4): 13 – Oct 1, 2020

TeleBCI: remote user training, monitoring, and communication with an evoked-potential brain-computer interface

Abstract

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can serve as a type of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). One hindrance to BCI adoption is the complexity of providing training and support for users. This paper describes the teleBCI interface used to train end-users in the operation of a virtual keyboard using an evoked potential BCI. Fifteen patients with motor neuron disease and their communication partners were included in...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2020.1848134
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can serve as a type of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). One hindrance to BCI adoption is the complexity of providing training and support for users. This paper describes the teleBCI interface used to train end-users in the operation of a virtual keyboard using an evoked potential BCI. Fifteen patients with motor neuron disease and their communication partners were included in the study. Teams completed 8 sessions of P300 BCI training virtually with the researcher. Over time, teams required less help to complete physical, computer, and BCI-specific tasks associated with device use. A subset of users experienced improved performance over sessions, progressing to utilize the full functionality of the speller and communicate with a nurse partner over a telemedicine interface. Integration of telemedicine in ALS care provides new opportunities for how BCI-AAC are deployed and used.

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2020

Keywords: P300; brain-computer interface; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; augmentative and alternative communication

References