Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Stupid Little Automata

Stupid Little Automata Nature has long served as an inspiration for the complexity of computation. But the goal of using digital tools is not in fact to replicate nature the way it exists but to produce new architectural scenarios. With the widespread use of computers in architectural design in the last two decades, the computer has passed from being a tool that would aid in the representation of architecture to one that generates architecture, form and culture. This article investigates the research conducted by cybernetician Gordon Pask on slime mold in the early 1960s and how he modeled life growth processes with computationally based cellular automata. There has been a resurgence of interest in cellular automata in recent digital experimentation and new collaborations between architects and scientists are on the rise. LabStudio, led by architect Jenny Sabin and biologist Peter Lloyd Jones, provides an exemplary case study. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Stupid Little Automata

Architecture and Culture , Volume 2 (2): 22 – Jul 1, 2014

Stupid Little Automata

Architecture and Culture , Volume 2 (2): 22 – Jul 1, 2014

Abstract

Nature has long served as an inspiration for the complexity of computation. But the goal of using digital tools is not in fact to replicate nature the way it exists but to produce new architectural scenarios. With the widespread use of computers in architectural design in the last two decades, the computer has passed from being a tool that would aid in the representation of architecture to one that generates architecture, form and culture. This article investigates the research conducted by cybernetician Gordon Pask on slime mold in the early 1960s and how he modeled life growth processes with computationally based cellular automata. There has been a resurgence of interest in cellular automata in recent digital experimentation and new collaborations between architects and scientists are on the rise. LabStudio, led by architect Jenny Sabin and biologist Peter Lloyd Jones, provides an exemplary case study.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/stupid-little-automata-l1fpX0svHc

References (33)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2014 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.2752/205078214X14030010181985
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nature has long served as an inspiration for the complexity of computation. But the goal of using digital tools is not in fact to replicate nature the way it exists but to produce new architectural scenarios. With the widespread use of computers in architectural design in the last two decades, the computer has passed from being a tool that would aid in the representation of architecture to one that generates architecture, form and culture. This article investigates the research conducted by cybernetician Gordon Pask on slime mold in the early 1960s and how he modeled life growth processes with computationally based cellular automata. There has been a resurgence of interest in cellular automata in recent digital experimentation and new collaborations between architects and scientists are on the rise. LabStudio, led by architect Jenny Sabin and biologist Peter Lloyd Jones, provides an exemplary case study.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2014

Keywords: cellular automata; computation; architecture; digital technologies; digital fabrication; biomimicry; bioinspiration

There are no references for this article.