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Silence, Stillness and the International Competition for the Arvo Pärt Centre

Silence, Stillness and the International Competition for the Arvo Pärt Centre AbstractThe paper examines how and why a number of entries to the International Architectural Design Contest for the building of the Arvo Pärt Centre at Laulasmaa, Estonia, sought to transpose Pärt’s music into built – or potentially buildable – form, emphasizing the conditions of silence and stillness in it. Marginally included in the twentieth-century movement of musical minimalism and deeply influenced by Russian Christian Orthodox faith, Pärt explores the translation into music of notions like ritual repetition and silent prayer through his tintinnabuli method: the combination of triadic arpeggios with melodic lines. The comparative investigation of their further translation in the competition entries aims to explore the design possibilities of silence and stillness examined as important material conditions of the understanding of architecture and natural landscape. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Silence, Stillness and the International Competition for the Arvo Pärt Centre

Architecture and Culture , Volume 4 (2): 22 – May 3, 2016

Silence, Stillness and the International Competition for the Arvo Pärt Centre

Architecture and Culture , Volume 4 (2): 22 – May 3, 2016

Abstract

AbstractThe paper examines how and why a number of entries to the International Architectural Design Contest for the building of the Arvo Pärt Centre at Laulasmaa, Estonia, sought to transpose Pärt’s music into built – or potentially buildable – form, emphasizing the conditions of silence and stillness in it. Marginally included in the twentieth-century movement of musical minimalism and deeply influenced by Russian Christian Orthodox faith, Pärt explores the translation into music of notions like ritual repetition and silent prayer through his tintinnabuli method: the combination of triadic arpeggios with melodic lines. The comparative investigation of their further translation in the competition entries aims to explore the design possibilities of silence and stillness examined as important material conditions of the understanding of architecture and natural landscape.

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References (46)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2016.1178999
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe paper examines how and why a number of entries to the International Architectural Design Contest for the building of the Arvo Pärt Centre at Laulasmaa, Estonia, sought to transpose Pärt’s music into built – or potentially buildable – form, emphasizing the conditions of silence and stillness in it. Marginally included in the twentieth-century movement of musical minimalism and deeply influenced by Russian Christian Orthodox faith, Pärt explores the translation into music of notions like ritual repetition and silent prayer through his tintinnabuli method: the combination of triadic arpeggios with melodic lines. The comparative investigation of their further translation in the competition entries aims to explore the design possibilities of silence and stillness examined as important material conditions of the understanding of architecture and natural landscape.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 3, 2016

Keywords: silence; stillness; architectural experience and representation; music and architecture

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