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Scandalous Artifacts: Practice between Archaeology and Architecture

Scandalous Artifacts: Practice between Archaeology and Architecture This paper argues that architecture and archaeology are simply (and not so simply) forms of one another, that some resemblances between them are explicit and revealed, and that others have become obscured with time. Both disciplines use drawing and both often work with buildings or artifacts because, uncontroversially, architecture and archaeology share aspects of common origin. Of the divergent and now occluded resemblances between the two disciplines, this paper argues that design for architecture and reconstruction for archaeology are almost identical. It further suggests that once rendered explicit through forms of interdisciplinary analysis and practice, design-reconstruction enables ways for interdisciplinary research to practice in the space between them. Using Claude Lévi-Strauss’ term “scandal” for transgressive social practice to inform Julia Kristeva’s interdisciplinary “site[s] of encounter,” this paper attempts to characterize the kinds of drawing practices - scandalous artifacts - that may be made between architecture and archaeology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Scandalous Artifacts: Practice between Archaeology and Architecture

Architecture and Culture , Volume 1 (1): 20 – Nov 1, 2013

Scandalous Artifacts: Practice between Archaeology and Architecture

Architecture and Culture , Volume 1 (1): 20 – Nov 1, 2013

Abstract

This paper argues that architecture and archaeology are simply (and not so simply) forms of one another, that some resemblances between them are explicit and revealed, and that others have become obscured with time. Both disciplines use drawing and both often work with buildings or artifacts because, uncontroversially, architecture and archaeology share aspects of common origin. Of the divergent and now occluded resemblances between the two disciplines, this paper argues that design for architecture and reconstruction for archaeology are almost identical. It further suggests that once rendered explicit through forms of interdisciplinary analysis and practice, design-reconstruction enables ways for interdisciplinary research to practice in the space between them. Using Claude Lévi-Strauss’ term “scandal” for transgressive social practice to inform Julia Kristeva’s interdisciplinary “site[s] of encounter,” this paper attempts to characterize the kinds of drawing practices - scandalous artifacts - that may be made between architecture and archaeology.

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References (42)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.2752/175145213X13756908698801
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper argues that architecture and archaeology are simply (and not so simply) forms of one another, that some resemblances between them are explicit and revealed, and that others have become obscured with time. Both disciplines use drawing and both often work with buildings or artifacts because, uncontroversially, architecture and archaeology share aspects of common origin. Of the divergent and now occluded resemblances between the two disciplines, this paper argues that design for architecture and reconstruction for archaeology are almost identical. It further suggests that once rendered explicit through forms of interdisciplinary analysis and practice, design-reconstruction enables ways for interdisciplinary research to practice in the space between them. Using Claude Lévi-Strauss’ term “scandal” for transgressive social practice to inform Julia Kristeva’s interdisciplinary “site[s] of encounter,” this paper attempts to characterize the kinds of drawing practices - scandalous artifacts - that may be made between architecture and archaeology.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2013

Keywords: architecture; archaeology; drawing; interdisciplinarity; transdisciplinarity reconstruction; design; scandal

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