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Revisiting deliberative policy analysis

Revisiting deliberative policy analysis POLICY STUDIES 2019, VOL. 40, NO. 5, 427–436 https://doi.org/10.1080/01442872.2019.1618813 INTRODUCTION a,b c,d Ya Li and Hendrik Wagenaar a b School of Public Administration, Beihang University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA; The International School of Government, King’s College, London, UK; Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, The University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia ARTICLE HISTORY Received 9 January 2019; Accepted 9 May 2019 The challenges of policy analysis It has been 15 years since Hajer and Wagenaar published Deliberative Policy Analysis (hereafter DPA). The book’s publication was one of the major developments in the post-positivist policy movement. The book’s subtitle “Understanding Governance in the Network Society” indicated DPA’s programmatic approach. It argued that the changing nature of the political-administrative system made traditional, technocratic information less effective as input into processes of policy and decision making. The editors, in their introduction to the book, depicted these changes in terms of a “network society”. Depart- ing from then fashionable theories of policy networks, they defined the network society according to five characteristics that “posed concrete challenges to policymaking and poli- tics” (Hajer and Wagenaar 2003, 8) These characteristics are: the proliferation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Policy Studies Taylor & Francis

Revisiting deliberative policy analysis

Policy Studies , Volume 40 (5): 10 – Sep 3, 2019

Revisiting deliberative policy analysis

Policy Studies , Volume 40 (5): 10 – Sep 3, 2019

Abstract

POLICY STUDIES 2019, VOL. 40, NO. 5, 427–436 https://doi.org/10.1080/01442872.2019.1618813 INTRODUCTION a,b c,d Ya Li and Hendrik Wagenaar a b School of Public Administration, Beihang University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA; The International School of Government, King’s College, London, UK; Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, The University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia ARTICLE HISTORY Received 9 January 2019; Accepted 9 May 2019 The challenges of policy analysis It has been 15 years since Hajer and Wagenaar published Deliberative Policy Analysis (hereafter DPA). The book’s publication was one of the major developments in the post-positivist policy movement. The book’s subtitle “Understanding Governance in the Network Society” indicated DPA’s programmatic approach. It argued that the changing nature of the political-administrative system made traditional, technocratic information less effective as input into processes of policy and decision making. The editors, in their introduction to the book, depicted these changes in terms of a “network society”. Depart- ing from then fashionable theories of policy networks, they defined the network society according to five characteristics that “posed concrete challenges to policymaking and poli- tics” (Hajer and Wagenaar 2003, 8) These characteristics are: the proliferation

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References (49)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1470-1006
eISSN
0144-2872
DOI
10.1080/01442872.2019.1618813
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

POLICY STUDIES 2019, VOL. 40, NO. 5, 427–436 https://doi.org/10.1080/01442872.2019.1618813 INTRODUCTION a,b c,d Ya Li and Hendrik Wagenaar a b School of Public Administration, Beihang University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA; The International School of Government, King’s College, London, UK; Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, The University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia ARTICLE HISTORY Received 9 January 2019; Accepted 9 May 2019 The challenges of policy analysis It has been 15 years since Hajer and Wagenaar published Deliberative Policy Analysis (hereafter DPA). The book’s publication was one of the major developments in the post-positivist policy movement. The book’s subtitle “Understanding Governance in the Network Society” indicated DPA’s programmatic approach. It argued that the changing nature of the political-administrative system made traditional, technocratic information less effective as input into processes of policy and decision making. The editors, in their introduction to the book, depicted these changes in terms of a “network society”. Depart- ing from then fashionable theories of policy networks, they defined the network society according to five characteristics that “posed concrete challenges to policymaking and poli- tics” (Hajer and Wagenaar 2003, 8) These characteristics are: the proliferation

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Policy StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 3, 2019

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