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Rainy Nights at Strand-on-the-Green with Cheerful Friends: Rediscovering Theo Crosby’s Original New Brutalist House

Rainy Nights at Strand-on-the-Green with Cheerful Friends: Rediscovering Theo Crosby’s Original... AbstractIn 1952, Alison and Peter Smithson designed their Soho House in central London. Published by their housemate Theo Crosby in Architectural Design magazine, the Smithsons claimed it as the first example of the “New Brutalism,” although it remained unbuilt. At the same time, Crosby designed for himself a small studio house at Strand-on-the-Green, West London that he built but which remains unpublished, even though it shares many of the Soho House’s Brutalist characteristics. This article makes use of Rudolf Wittkower’s proportional theories – dear to New Brutalist discourse – to analyze and compare the two houses. Through analysis of the original drawings, New Brutalist discourse and the biography of its architect, the article examines Crosby’s house for the first time, contextualizes it in terms of the New Brutalist canon and considers possible reasons for its previous oversight. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Rainy Nights at Strand-on-the-Green with Cheerful Friends: Rediscovering Theo Crosby’s Original New Brutalist House

Architecture and Culture , Volume 7 (2): 26 – May 4, 2019

Rainy Nights at Strand-on-the-Green with Cheerful Friends: Rediscovering Theo Crosby’s Original New Brutalist House

Architecture and Culture , Volume 7 (2): 26 – May 4, 2019

Abstract

AbstractIn 1952, Alison and Peter Smithson designed their Soho House in central London. Published by their housemate Theo Crosby in Architectural Design magazine, the Smithsons claimed it as the first example of the “New Brutalism,” although it remained unbuilt. At the same time, Crosby designed for himself a small studio house at Strand-on-the-Green, West London that he built but which remains unpublished, even though it shares many of the Soho House’s Brutalist characteristics. This article makes use of Rudolf Wittkower’s proportional theories – dear to New Brutalist discourse – to analyze and compare the two houses. Through analysis of the original drawings, New Brutalist discourse and the biography of its architect, the article examines Crosby’s house for the first time, contextualizes it in terms of the New Brutalist canon and considers possible reasons for its previous oversight.

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References (76)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2019.1646571
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn 1952, Alison and Peter Smithson designed their Soho House in central London. Published by their housemate Theo Crosby in Architectural Design magazine, the Smithsons claimed it as the first example of the “New Brutalism,” although it remained unbuilt. At the same time, Crosby designed for himself a small studio house at Strand-on-the-Green, West London that he built but which remains unpublished, even though it shares many of the Soho House’s Brutalist characteristics. This article makes use of Rudolf Wittkower’s proportional theories – dear to New Brutalist discourse – to analyze and compare the two houses. Through analysis of the original drawings, New Brutalist discourse and the biography of its architect, the article examines Crosby’s house for the first time, contextualizes it in terms of the New Brutalist canon and considers possible reasons for its previous oversight.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: May 4, 2019

Keywords: Theo Crosby; Alison and Peter Smithson; New Brutalism; Soho House

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