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Race and Inclusion in Volunteerism: Using Communication Theory to Improve Volunteer Retention

Race and Inclusion in Volunteerism: Using Communication Theory to Improve Volunteer Retention Maintaining relationships with racially diverse audiences can challenge nonprofit organizations. Through a survey of 634 volunteers, this study examined the role of inclusion in predicting relationship quality and future volunteerism for participants of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, including African Americans, Asians, Caucasians, and Hispanic/Latinos. Results suggest a positive relationship between level of inclusion, relationship quality, and future volunteer intention. However, inclusion was varied among groups indicating that communication and inclusive behaviors are experienced differently for diverse audiences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Relations Research Taylor & Francis

Race and Inclusion in Volunteerism: Using Communication Theory to Improve Volunteer Retention

Race and Inclusion in Volunteerism: Using Communication Theory to Improve Volunteer Retention

Abstract

Maintaining relationships with racially diverse audiences can challenge nonprofit organizations. Through a survey of 634 volunteers, this study examined the role of inclusion in predicting relationship quality and future volunteerism for participants of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, including African Americans, Asians, Caucasians, and Hispanic/Latinos. Results suggest a positive relationship between level of inclusion, relationship quality, and future volunteer intention. However,...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-754X
eISSN
1062-726X
DOI
10.1080/1062726X.2013.864245
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maintaining relationships with racially diverse audiences can challenge nonprofit organizations. Through a survey of 634 volunteers, this study examined the role of inclusion in predicting relationship quality and future volunteerism for participants of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, including African Americans, Asians, Caucasians, and Hispanic/Latinos. Results suggest a positive relationship between level of inclusion, relationship quality, and future volunteer intention. However, inclusion was varied among groups indicating that communication and inclusive behaviors are experienced differently for diverse audiences.

Journal

Journal of Public Relations ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: May 27, 2014

References