Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

‘Push’ versus ‘pull’ factors in migration outflows and returns: Determinants of migration status and spell duration among China's rural population

‘Push’ versus ‘pull’ factors in migration outflows and returns: Determinants of migration status... The tremendous abundance of labour in rural areas is one of the most perplexing issues currently facing policy‐makers in the People's Republic of China. Central and municipal authorities fear that large‐scale labour movement out of rural China will have politically and socially destabilising effects on the cities and towns to which workers migrate. Recognising that there may be positive economic aspects associated with rural labour outflow, this research seeks to shed light on the transfer process with an emphasis on identifying the factors which motivate the observed frequent movement of migrants between their origin and destination points. Using household data collected in rural China, we investigate both out migration and return migration decisions. We demonstrate that observed migration patterns are the outcome of informed, rational responses to an environment filled with uncertainty and incomplete markets. To the extent that policymakers wish to minimise the more transient component of rural out‐migration, attention must be paid to the underlying rural and urban institutions which give rise to the observed migration patterns. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Development Studies Taylor & Francis

‘Push’ versus ‘pull’ factors in migration outflows and returns: Determinants of migration status and spell duration among China's rural population

Journal of Development Studies , Volume 35 (3): 28 – Feb 1, 1999
28 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/push-versus-pull-factors-in-migration-outflows-and-returns-SGcte0DyxV

References (22)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1743-9140
eISSN
0022-0388
DOI
10.1080/00220389908422573
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The tremendous abundance of labour in rural areas is one of the most perplexing issues currently facing policy‐makers in the People's Republic of China. Central and municipal authorities fear that large‐scale labour movement out of rural China will have politically and socially destabilising effects on the cities and towns to which workers migrate. Recognising that there may be positive economic aspects associated with rural labour outflow, this research seeks to shed light on the transfer process with an emphasis on identifying the factors which motivate the observed frequent movement of migrants between their origin and destination points. Using household data collected in rural China, we investigate both out migration and return migration decisions. We demonstrate that observed migration patterns are the outcome of informed, rational responses to an environment filled with uncertainty and incomplete markets. To the extent that policymakers wish to minimise the more transient component of rural out‐migration, attention must be paid to the underlying rural and urban institutions which give rise to the observed migration patterns.

Journal

Journal of Development StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.