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Postscript

Postscript Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. II, No. I, January 2002 (© 2002) Salomon Rettig · Over the years many theorists have called for the conceptual separation between the unique communicative behaviors of Homo sapiens and the more purely instrumental behaviors shared by all living organisms. Instrumental acts are sensory-motor behaviors that serve as means or agents in producing given effects. Many such acts are carried out automatically (Bargh & Chartrand, 1999). of a species. Such means-ends behaviors are essential to the physical survival Communicative acts, on the other hand, are those that relate one member of a species to other members of the same species. In humans communicative behaviors usually consist of symbolically mediated acts, which is language. Hence, they require knowledge oflanguage usages, including speech, writing, and reading. These, in turn, reflect cognitive processes. Furthermore, and in contrast to instrumental acts, symbolically communicative behaviors are not always directed toward tangible objectives. They can and often do serve a purely evocative function that conveys the mood or the intellectual preoccupation of a person, or both. Such expressive acts are intrinsically satisfying. At such times focal attention is on the moment of articulation rather than on any http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Distress and Homeless Taylor & Francis

Postscript

Journal of Social Distress and Homeless , Volume 11 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 2002

Postscript

Abstract

Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. II, No. I, January 2002 (© 2002) Salomon Rettig · Over the years many theorists have called for the conceptual separation between the unique communicative behaviors of Homo sapiens and the more purely instrumental behaviors shared by all living organisms. Instrumental acts are sensory-motor behaviors that serve as means or agents in producing given effects. Many such acts are carried out automatically (Bargh & Chartrand, 1999)....
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 2002 Taylor and Francis Group LLC
ISSN
1573-658X
eISSN
1053-0789
DOI
10.1023/A:1013340427781
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, Vol. II, No. I, January 2002 (© 2002) Salomon Rettig · Over the years many theorists have called for the conceptual separation between the unique communicative behaviors of Homo sapiens and the more purely instrumental behaviors shared by all living organisms. Instrumental acts are sensory-motor behaviors that serve as means or agents in producing given effects. Many such acts are carried out automatically (Bargh & Chartrand, 1999). of a species. Such means-ends behaviors are essential to the physical survival Communicative acts, on the other hand, are those that relate one member of a species to other members of the same species. In humans communicative behaviors usually consist of symbolically mediated acts, which is language. Hence, they require knowledge oflanguage usages, including speech, writing, and reading. These, in turn, reflect cognitive processes. Furthermore, and in contrast to instrumental acts, symbolically communicative behaviors are not always directed toward tangible objectives. They can and often do serve a purely evocative function that conveys the mood or the intellectual preoccupation of a person, or both. Such expressive acts are intrinsically satisfying. At such times focal attention is on the moment of articulation rather than on any

Journal

Journal of Social Distress and HomelessTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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