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Patients with traumatic brain injury referred to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme: social and professional outcome for 508 Finnish patients 5 or more years after injury

Patients with traumatic brain injury referred to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme:... We studied influence of age and educational level before injury on the social and vocational outcome among a group of traumatic brain injury TBI patients with post-injury problems in their education and employment. Patients with TBI, followed up for at least 5 years, and who were admitted to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme, were selected for evaluation of long-term outcome. We used the Glasgow Coma Scale GCS scores at the time of emergency admission to the hospital to measure brain injury severity. Age at the time of TBI and educational status before TBI were correlated with the outcome measures at the end of follow-up separately in each category of brain injury severity. The study was carried out at the Kauniala outpatient neurological clinic, which specializes in brain injuries in Finland; it works closely with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery at the Helsinki University Central Hospital. Main outcome measures were functional outcome measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale GOS, the educational level reached, and postinjury occupation, as well as the incapacity for work at the end of follow-up. In the severe category of brain injuries, children 7 years or younger at the time of injury suffered severe disability as measured by 2 the GOS scores more often than did the older age groups (p = 0·010, χ2). They were less often 2 capable of independent employment (p = 0·011, χ2) than the children injured at the age of 8-16. Patients with a higher education usually had a better outcome. In the category of mild brain injuries the majority of the patients, regardless of age, recovered well according to the GOS, and were capable of independent employment at the end of follow-up. Our patients were selected from the TBI population as survivors with problems in education and re-employment. Those with severe injury sustained early in life childhood and early teens coupled with poor educational attainment had relatively worse social and vocational outcome; better outcomes were enjoyed by those severely injured individuals whose injuries were sustained later late teens or early adulthood. In the groups of patients with moderate and mild brain injuries such a relationship was not found between age or pre-injury education and outcome. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Injury Taylor & Francis

Patients with traumatic brain injury referred to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme: social and professional outcome for 508 Finnish patients 5 or more years after injury

Brain Injury , Volume 10 (12): 18 – Jan 1, 1996

Patients with traumatic brain injury referred to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme: social and professional outcome for 508 Finnish patients 5 or more years after injury

Brain Injury , Volume 10 (12): 18 – Jan 1, 1996

Abstract

We studied influence of age and educational level before injury on the social and vocational outcome among a group of traumatic brain injury TBI patients with post-injury problems in their education and employment. Patients with TBI, followed up for at least 5 years, and who were admitted to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme, were selected for evaluation of long-term outcome. We used the Glasgow Coma Scale GCS scores at the time of emergency admission to the hospital to measure brain injury severity. Age at the time of TBI and educational status before TBI were correlated with the outcome measures at the end of follow-up separately in each category of brain injury severity. The study was carried out at the Kauniala outpatient neurological clinic, which specializes in brain injuries in Finland; it works closely with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery at the Helsinki University Central Hospital. Main outcome measures were functional outcome measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale GOS, the educational level reached, and postinjury occupation, as well as the incapacity for work at the end of follow-up. In the severe category of brain injuries, children 7 years or younger at the time of injury suffered severe disability as measured by 2 the GOS scores more often than did the older age groups (p = 0·010, χ2). They were less often 2 capable of independent employment (p = 0·011, χ2) than the children injured at the age of 8-16. Patients with a higher education usually had a better outcome. In the category of mild brain injuries the majority of the patients, regardless of age, recovered well according to the GOS, and were capable of independent employment at the end of follow-up. Our patients were selected from the TBI population as survivors with problems in education and re-employment. Those with severe injury sustained early in life childhood and early teens coupled with poor educational attainment had relatively worse social and vocational outcome; better outcomes were enjoyed by those severely injured individuals whose injuries were sustained later late teens or early adulthood. In the groups of patients with moderate and mild brain injuries such a relationship was not found between age or pre-injury education and outcome.

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References (42)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1996 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1362-301X
eISSN
0269-9052
DOI
10.1080/026990596123864
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We studied influence of age and educational level before injury on the social and vocational outcome among a group of traumatic brain injury TBI patients with post-injury problems in their education and employment. Patients with TBI, followed up for at least 5 years, and who were admitted to a rehabilitation and re-employment programme, were selected for evaluation of long-term outcome. We used the Glasgow Coma Scale GCS scores at the time of emergency admission to the hospital to measure brain injury severity. Age at the time of TBI and educational status before TBI were correlated with the outcome measures at the end of follow-up separately in each category of brain injury severity. The study was carried out at the Kauniala outpatient neurological clinic, which specializes in brain injuries in Finland; it works closely with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery at the Helsinki University Central Hospital. Main outcome measures were functional outcome measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale GOS, the educational level reached, and postinjury occupation, as well as the incapacity for work at the end of follow-up. In the severe category of brain injuries, children 7 years or younger at the time of injury suffered severe disability as measured by 2 the GOS scores more often than did the older age groups (p = 0·010, χ2). They were less often 2 capable of independent employment (p = 0·011, χ2) than the children injured at the age of 8-16. Patients with a higher education usually had a better outcome. In the category of mild brain injuries the majority of the patients, regardless of age, recovered well according to the GOS, and were capable of independent employment at the end of follow-up. Our patients were selected from the TBI population as survivors with problems in education and re-employment. Those with severe injury sustained early in life childhood and early teens coupled with poor educational attainment had relatively worse social and vocational outcome; better outcomes were enjoyed by those severely injured individuals whose injuries were sustained later late teens or early adulthood. In the groups of patients with moderate and mild brain injuries such a relationship was not found between age or pre-injury education and outcome.

Journal

Brain InjuryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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