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Paris Plays Itself: Widescreen and the City

Paris Plays Itself: Widescreen and the City Drawing on the video work of Thom Andersen and the film criticism of Manny Farber, this article argues that negative space in widescreen cinema constitutes a kind of optical unconscious whose urban content can be reactivated through a critical re-viewing of films that privileges location over narrative content. In a discussion of three French widescreen films of 1967, Jacques Tati’s Playtime, Jean-Luc Godard’s Two or Three Things I Know About Her and Jean-Pierre Melville’s The Samurai, it further suggests that genre films with no avowed urbanistic content may provide insights into the city unavailable from a more explicitly sociological cinema. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

Paris Plays Itself: Widescreen and the City

Architecture and Culture , Volume 3 (1): 15 – Mar 1, 2015

Paris Plays Itself: Widescreen and the City

Architecture and Culture , Volume 3 (1): 15 – Mar 1, 2015

Abstract

Drawing on the video work of Thom Andersen and the film criticism of Manny Farber, this article argues that negative space in widescreen cinema constitutes a kind of optical unconscious whose urban content can be reactivated through a critical re-viewing of films that privileges location over narrative content. In a discussion of three French widescreen films of 1967, Jacques Tati’s Playtime, Jean-Luc Godard’s Two or Three Things I Know About Her and Jean-Pierre Melville’s The Samurai, it further suggests that genre films with no avowed urbanistic content may provide insights into the city unavailable from a more explicitly sociological cinema.

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References (51)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.2752/205078215X14236574273547
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drawing on the video work of Thom Andersen and the film criticism of Manny Farber, this article argues that negative space in widescreen cinema constitutes a kind of optical unconscious whose urban content can be reactivated through a critical re-viewing of films that privileges location over narrative content. In a discussion of three French widescreen films of 1967, Jacques Tati’s Playtime, Jean-Luc Godard’s Two or Three Things I Know About Her and Jean-Pierre Melville’s The Samurai, it further suggests that genre films with no avowed urbanistic content may provide insights into the city unavailable from a more explicitly sociological cinema.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2015

Keywords: urbanism; widescreen; negative space; optical unconscious; Thom Andersen; Manny Farber

There are no references for this article.