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Neuroethics and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs)

Neuroethics and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2016 Vol. 3, No. 3, 123–125, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2016.1210989 EDITORIAL 1. Introduction to neuroethics and BCIs ethical heuristic in neuroethics: first determine the kind of neurotechnology at issue, then analyze its ethical Advances in brain-computer interface (or brain-machine implications. Although this rule of thumb may not yield interface) technology raise interesting and important ethi- simple solutions to complex problems, it has been help- cal questions. BCI researchers encounter some of these ful when particular kinds of neurotechnology travel with questions, such as informed consent, during regulatory different families of ethical concerns. For instance, pri- processes, such as institutional review board (IRB), ani- vacy tends to be an ethical concern raised by gleaning mal use, or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) device neurotechnologies, whereas issues of autonomy tend to applications. Ethical issues raised by BCI go beyond be of relevance to intervening neurotechnologies. strict regulatory matters, and include broader concerns Examples of the directionality heuristic outside of with autonomy, agency, responsibility, identity, and nor- BCI are not hard to find. Functional MRI used to iden- mality, and these questions are beginning to gain atten- tify psychological traits (‘brainotyping’) is an exam- tion.[1,2] The Gray Matters report of the President’s ple.[7] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain-Computer Interfaces Taylor & Francis

Neuroethics and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs)

Brain-Computer Interfaces , Volume 3 (3): 3 – Jul 2, 2016

Neuroethics and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs)

Abstract

Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2016 Vol. 3, No. 3, 123–125, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2016.1210989 EDITORIAL 1. Introduction to neuroethics and BCIs ethical heuristic in neuroethics: first determine the kind of neurotechnology at issue, then analyze its ethical Advances in brain-computer interface (or brain-machine implications. Although this rule of thumb may not yield interface) technology raise interesting and important ethi- simple solutions to complex problems, it has...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2326-2621
eISSN
2326-263x
DOI
10.1080/2326263X.2016.1210989
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brain-Computer Interfaces, 2016 Vol. 3, No. 3, 123–125, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2016.1210989 EDITORIAL 1. Introduction to neuroethics and BCIs ethical heuristic in neuroethics: first determine the kind of neurotechnology at issue, then analyze its ethical Advances in brain-computer interface (or brain-machine implications. Although this rule of thumb may not yield interface) technology raise interesting and important ethi- simple solutions to complex problems, it has been help- cal questions. BCI researchers encounter some of these ful when particular kinds of neurotechnology travel with questions, such as informed consent, during regulatory different families of ethical concerns. For instance, pri- processes, such as institutional review board (IRB), ani- vacy tends to be an ethical concern raised by gleaning mal use, or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) device neurotechnologies, whereas issues of autonomy tend to applications. Ethical issues raised by BCI go beyond be of relevance to intervening neurotechnologies. strict regulatory matters, and include broader concerns Examples of the directionality heuristic outside of with autonomy, agency, responsibility, identity, and nor- BCI are not hard to find. Functional MRI used to iden- mality, and these questions are beginning to gain atten- tify psychological traits (‘brainotyping’) is an exam- tion.[1,2] The Gray Matters report of the President’s ple.[7]

Journal

Brain-Computer InterfacesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 2, 2016

References