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Movement analysis of sit-to-stand – research informing clinical practice

Movement analysis of sit-to-stand – research informing clinical practice AbstractBackground:Sit-to-stand (STS) is a crucial transfer influencing a person's independence in daily activities, as well as safety and quality of life, and is thus vital to evaluate in research and in practice. Clinical STS tests provide single values in seconds or numbers of STS. There is, however, increasing numbers of research papers reporting spatial and temporal kinematic and kinetic process STS data.Objectives:To provide an overview of research findings from laboratory-based movement analyses regarding phases and determinants of typical STS, characteristics of successful versus failed STS transfers, and finally STS performance in some neurological conditions.Major Findings:The STS transfer, previously regarded as mainly requiring lower limb muscle strength, is increasingly recognized as a complex transfer skill. Muscle strength, balance, foot position, chair height and the movement strategy are major determinants influencing STS performance. Scaling and timing of momentum generation throughout STS seems critical for success or failure. Sit-to-stand in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by asymmetry in force generation and difficulties in switching movement direction, respectively. In-depth, knowledge regarding mechanisms of momentum control during STS sub-phases, STS failures, as well as exploration of variability in normal and atypical STS is still lacking.Conclusions:Recent research based on instrumented movement analyses has generated better understanding of movement control during STS, but the specifics are not yet reflected in clinical assessments. There seems to be a call for clinical tools capturing determinants and process characteristics of the STS transfer for a more comprehensive evaluation in rehabilitation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Therapy Reviews Taylor & Francis

Movement analysis of sit-to-stand – research informing clinical practice

Movement analysis of sit-to-stand – research informing clinical practice

Physical Therapy Reviews , Volume 20 (3): 12 – Jun 1, 2015

Abstract

AbstractBackground:Sit-to-stand (STS) is a crucial transfer influencing a person's independence in daily activities, as well as safety and quality of life, and is thus vital to evaluate in research and in practice. Clinical STS tests provide single values in seconds or numbers of STS. There is, however, increasing numbers of research papers reporting spatial and temporal kinematic and kinetic process STS data.Objectives:To provide an overview of research findings from laboratory-based movement analyses regarding phases and determinants of typical STS, characteristics of successful versus failed STS transfers, and finally STS performance in some neurological conditions.Major Findings:The STS transfer, previously regarded as mainly requiring lower limb muscle strength, is increasingly recognized as a complex transfer skill. Muscle strength, balance, foot position, chair height and the movement strategy are major determinants influencing STS performance. Scaling and timing of momentum generation throughout STS seems critical for success or failure. Sit-to-stand in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by asymmetry in force generation and difficulties in switching movement direction, respectively. In-depth, knowledge regarding mechanisms of momentum control during STS sub-phases, STS failures, as well as exploration of variability in normal and atypical STS is still lacking.Conclusions:Recent research based on instrumented movement analyses has generated better understanding of movement control during STS, but the specifics are not yet reflected in clinical assessments. There seems to be a call for clinical tools capturing determinants and process characteristics of the STS transfer for a more comprehensive evaluation in rehabilitation.

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References (138)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2015
ISSN
1743-288X
eISSN
1083-3196
DOI
10.1179/1743288X15Y.0000000005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground:Sit-to-stand (STS) is a crucial transfer influencing a person's independence in daily activities, as well as safety and quality of life, and is thus vital to evaluate in research and in practice. Clinical STS tests provide single values in seconds or numbers of STS. There is, however, increasing numbers of research papers reporting spatial and temporal kinematic and kinetic process STS data.Objectives:To provide an overview of research findings from laboratory-based movement analyses regarding phases and determinants of typical STS, characteristics of successful versus failed STS transfers, and finally STS performance in some neurological conditions.Major Findings:The STS transfer, previously regarded as mainly requiring lower limb muscle strength, is increasingly recognized as a complex transfer skill. Muscle strength, balance, foot position, chair height and the movement strategy are major determinants influencing STS performance. Scaling and timing of momentum generation throughout STS seems critical for success or failure. Sit-to-stand in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by asymmetry in force generation and difficulties in switching movement direction, respectively. In-depth, knowledge regarding mechanisms of momentum control during STS sub-phases, STS failures, as well as exploration of variability in normal and atypical STS is still lacking.Conclusions:Recent research based on instrumented movement analyses has generated better understanding of movement control during STS, but the specifics are not yet reflected in clinical assessments. There seems to be a call for clinical tools capturing determinants and process characteristics of the STS transfer for a more comprehensive evaluation in rehabilitation.

Journal

Physical Therapy ReviewsTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2015

Keywords: Sit-to-stand; Movement analysis; Momentum control; Kinematics; Kinetics

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