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Mental health support needs of people with a learning difficulty: a medical or a social model?

Mental health support needs of people with a learning difficulty: a medical or a social model? People with learning difficulties, like all disabled people, face social oppression. Much recent policy and practice are underpinned by at least some understanding of this oppression, and the social model of disability has been influential in discussions of services and supports for people with learning difficulties. However, in the area of mental health, the picture is somewhat different. This paper argues that the medical model has predominated in discussions of mental health support for people with learning difficulties, and that a social model approach could have much to offer. The paper draws on an ongoing action research study in which service providers, families and young people with learning difficulties are working together to articulate what is needed, in order to find routes to improve the support offered to young people with learning difficulties and mental health support needs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability & Society Taylor & Francis

Mental health support needs of people with a learning difficulty: a medical or a social model?

Disability & Society , Volume 20 (3): 15 – May 1, 2005
15 pages

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References (46)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1360-0508
eISSN
0968-7599
DOI
10.1080/09687590500060554
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

People with learning difficulties, like all disabled people, face social oppression. Much recent policy and practice are underpinned by at least some understanding of this oppression, and the social model of disability has been influential in discussions of services and supports for people with learning difficulties. However, in the area of mental health, the picture is somewhat different. This paper argues that the medical model has predominated in discussions of mental health support for people with learning difficulties, and that a social model approach could have much to offer. The paper draws on an ongoing action research study in which service providers, families and young people with learning difficulties are working together to articulate what is needed, in order to find routes to improve the support offered to young people with learning difficulties and mental health support needs.

Journal

Disability & SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2005

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