Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Mass” Housing in the Social and the Post-Social Worlds: Reading Hannah Arendt’s “Mass Society”

“Mass” Housing in the Social and the Post-Social Worlds: Reading Hannah Arendt’s “Mass Society” Abstract In The Human Condition (1958), Hannah Arendt predicated her thesis on societal introspection on what she called “mass society” – a population which had rapidly grown, urbanized and atomized, bringing new imperatives for humans to live together in vast numbers and with closer proximities. Throughout, Arendt discusses how shifting boundaries of public and private define our cities and our lives. As her mass society of three billion now approaches eight billion, how has the relationship between public and private – city and household – played out in the staggering population growth of the sixty years since her book? This article will explore how these six decades since the publication of The Human Condition have seen fundamental transformations in the way we understand what we now call housing, its relationship with the city, and its relationship with collective life. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architecture and Culture Taylor & Francis

“Mass” Housing in the Social and the Post-Social Worlds: Reading Hannah Arendt’s “Mass Society”

Architecture and Culture , Volume 8 (3-4): 16 – Oct 1, 2020

“Mass” Housing in the Social and the Post-Social Worlds: Reading Hannah Arendt’s “Mass Society”

Architecture and Culture , Volume 8 (3-4): 16 – Oct 1, 2020

Abstract

Abstract In The Human Condition (1958), Hannah Arendt predicated her thesis on societal introspection on what she called “mass society” – a population which had rapidly grown, urbanized and atomized, bringing new imperatives for humans to live together in vast numbers and with closer proximities. Throughout, Arendt discusses how shifting boundaries of public and private define our cities and our lives. As her mass society of three billion now approaches eight billion, how has the relationship between public and private – city and household – played out in the staggering population growth of the sixty years since her book? This article will explore how these six decades since the publication of The Human Condition have seen fundamental transformations in the way we understand what we now call housing, its relationship with the city, and its relationship with collective life.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/mass-housing-in-the-social-and-the-post-social-worlds-reading-hannah-mN7ZR70wvw

References (29)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
2050-7836
eISSN
2050-7828
DOI
10.1080/20507828.2020.1792151
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In The Human Condition (1958), Hannah Arendt predicated her thesis on societal introspection on what she called “mass society” – a population which had rapidly grown, urbanized and atomized, bringing new imperatives for humans to live together in vast numbers and with closer proximities. Throughout, Arendt discusses how shifting boundaries of public and private define our cities and our lives. As her mass society of three billion now approaches eight billion, how has the relationship between public and private – city and household – played out in the staggering population growth of the sixty years since her book? This article will explore how these six decades since the publication of The Human Condition have seen fundamental transformations in the way we understand what we now call housing, its relationship with the city, and its relationship with collective life.

Journal

Architecture and CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2020

Keywords: Arendt; housing; population growth; mass society; Unité d’Habitation; Barbican

There are no references for this article.