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Making feedback and post-occupancy evaluation routine 1: A portfolio of feedback techniques

Making feedback and post-occupancy evaluation routine 1: A portfolio of feedback techniques Over forty years ago, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) published its Plan of Work for Design Team Operation(1963), which included Stage M – Feedback. In spite of this, designers, builders and sometimes even procuring clients do not engage closely with the performance of the buildings they have created. Hence, low-level, chronic problems tend to persist, innovations miss their targets, and true successes may be overlooked – even in some of the best buildings, as the Probe series of post-occupancy surveys revealed. This paper discusses how feedback, follow through from design and construction into occupancy, and post-occupancy evaluation could become a natural part of project delivery, and how this could improve the quality and sustainability of our buildings. It describes progress made since the Probe series of post-occupancy ended in encouraging the use of feedback, including a portfolio of established techniques, development of the Soft Landings technique, and setting up a charity to promote and support feedback. The results of tests with a user group are also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building Research & Information Taylor & Francis

Making feedback and post-occupancy evaluation routine 1: A portfolio of feedback techniques

Building Research & Information , Volume 33 (4): 6 – Jul 1, 2005
6 pages

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References (18)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Bordass & Leaman
ISSN
1466-4321
eISSN
0961-3218
DOI
10.1080/09613210500162016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Over forty years ago, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) published its Plan of Work for Design Team Operation(1963), which included Stage M – Feedback. In spite of this, designers, builders and sometimes even procuring clients do not engage closely with the performance of the buildings they have created. Hence, low-level, chronic problems tend to persist, innovations miss their targets, and true successes may be overlooked – even in some of the best buildings, as the Probe series of post-occupancy surveys revealed. This paper discusses how feedback, follow through from design and construction into occupancy, and post-occupancy evaluation could become a natural part of project delivery, and how this could improve the quality and sustainability of our buildings. It describes progress made since the Probe series of post-occupancy ended in encouraging the use of feedback, including a portfolio of established techniques, development of the Soft Landings technique, and setting up a charity to promote and support feedback. The results of tests with a user group are also discussed.

Journal

Building Research & InformationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2005

Keywords: building performance; continuous improvement; feedback; follow-through; learning; post-occupancy evaluation; Probe; project delivery; quality control; user surveys; performances des bâtiments; amélioration continue; retour d'information; suivi; enseignement; évaluation après emménagement; Probe; fourniture d'un projet; contrôle de la qualité; enquêtes auprès des utilisateurs

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