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Level of Aspiration as a Method of Studying Personality: IV. The Analysis of Patterns of Response

Level of Aspiration as a Method of Studying Personality: IV. The Analysis of Patterns of Response The Journal of Social Psychology, 1945, 9, 159-177. LEVEL OF ASPIRATION AS A METHOD OF STUDYING PER- SONALITY: IV. THE ANALYSIS OF PATTERNS OF RESPONSE. * Norwich State Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut JULIAN B. ROTTER A. INTRODUCTION Previous studies of individual differences in the level of aspiration situa- tion have attempted with little success (1, 2) to relate “character traits” directly to a single derived score, usually dne representing the difference between the subject’s stated aspiration and performance. The last article in this series (6) indicated that in a problem situation involving self-evaluation, i.e., the level of aspiration situation, stable modes of reaction obtain. However, it was found that these modes of reaction or personality characteristics did not bear a linear relationship to any single score or index. The analysis of extreme Scores suggested the presence of several patterns of response and that the interpretation of the meaning of any score depended upon its relationship to other Scores and the general behavior in the situation. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether such patterns can be distinguished and if so, to discover their characteristics and meaning. B. METTI~OD The method used has been described in detail in an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Social Psychology Taylor & Francis

Level of Aspiration as a Method of Studying Personality: IV. The Analysis of Patterns of Response

The Journal of Social Psychology , Volume 21 (2): 19 – May 1, 1945

Level of Aspiration as a Method of Studying Personality: IV. The Analysis of Patterns of Response

The Journal of Social Psychology , Volume 21 (2): 19 – May 1, 1945

Abstract

The Journal of Social Psychology, 1945, 9, 159-177. LEVEL OF ASPIRATION AS A METHOD OF STUDYING PER- SONALITY: IV. THE ANALYSIS OF PATTERNS OF RESPONSE. * Norwich State Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut JULIAN B. ROTTER A. INTRODUCTION Previous studies of individual differences in the level of aspiration situa- tion have attempted with little success (1, 2) to relate “character traits” directly to a single derived score, usually dne representing the difference between the subject’s stated aspiration and performance. The last article in this series (6) indicated that in a problem situation involving self-evaluation, i.e., the level of aspiration situation, stable modes of reaction obtain. However, it was found that these modes of reaction or personality characteristics did not bear a linear relationship to any single score or index. The analysis of extreme Scores suggested the presence of several patterns of response and that the interpretation of the meaning of any score depended upon its relationship to other Scores and the general behavior in the situation. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether such patterns can be distinguished and if so, to discover their characteristics and meaning. B. METTI~OD The method used has been described in detail in an

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References (6)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-1183
eISSN
0022-4545
DOI
10.1080/00224545.1945.9714163
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Journal of Social Psychology, 1945, 9, 159-177. LEVEL OF ASPIRATION AS A METHOD OF STUDYING PER- SONALITY: IV. THE ANALYSIS OF PATTERNS OF RESPONSE. * Norwich State Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut JULIAN B. ROTTER A. INTRODUCTION Previous studies of individual differences in the level of aspiration situa- tion have attempted with little success (1, 2) to relate “character traits” directly to a single derived score, usually dne representing the difference between the subject’s stated aspiration and performance. The last article in this series (6) indicated that in a problem situation involving self-evaluation, i.e., the level of aspiration situation, stable modes of reaction obtain. However, it was found that these modes of reaction or personality characteristics did not bear a linear relationship to any single score or index. The analysis of extreme Scores suggested the presence of several patterns of response and that the interpretation of the meaning of any score depended upon its relationship to other Scores and the general behavior in the situation. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether such patterns can be distinguished and if so, to discover their characteristics and meaning. B. METTI~OD The method used has been described in detail in an

Journal

The Journal of Social PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 1945

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